Comments

Episode-1668- Rod Woods on Permaculture on Small Acreage — 22 Comments

  1. I just opened the page, haven’t even listened yet. But just had to say what an awesome cover photo. That just brightened me right up even more than I already was.
    Evelyn

  2. What a fungi! I enjoyed the interview with Rod, he’s not scared to learn and try new things. He’s seems at home in his own skin (and that T shirt). I find permaculture tends to attract optimists and that’s what makes it fun.

  3. I like the idea of diversifying the compost. It may help connect the continent through the true underground!

    All Plants Unite!

    Uniting Permacultuists everywhere – lol

    Evelyn

  4. Top 5 Metal Bands
    1. Motorhead
    2. System of a Down
    3. Pantera
    4. Rage Against the Machine
    5. Tool/A Perfect Circle

    Good Show!
    Last time I was in Austin I saw Lynch Mob on Friday night, and Cinderella on Saturday.

  5. When I go hiking in some nice woods I’ll grab a bit of ‘duff’ and then add it to my compost.

    Most permaculture questions get answered with ‘It depends’…but diversity usually is the answer. I often say – ‘It depends and diversity wins’. If A,B and C are all viable options figure out how to do all three and nature will decide the best answer.

    I enjoyed the conversation – thank you.

  6. Confused on how he is doing the microgreens.
    If he is growing them in rockwool, then it sounds like he is doing hydroponics. Is he using the compost tea in the hydroponics? Claimed he can’t grow plants without fungi, but then grows them in rockwool!?
    Not saying I disagree or anything, but would like clarification as this sounds really interesting to do hydroponics without buying weird dried bat dung and stuff.

    • Hey Richard,

      I can tell you that microgreens do amazingly well with compost tea! In the winter when I want something green to eat I will use a standard 10×20 tray and line it with two layers of paper towel, and water solely with compost tea. I do not do anything fancy to make the compost tea either. I have a five gallon bucket with a few cups of compost in it and an air stone in the bottom. I usually let it bubble for a few days before using it.

      • Is this a hydroponic tray of growing media or a tray of soil? i.e. is the compost tea the only input?

  7. Richard here’s my best answer. In soil fungi break down organic matter into nitrogen to feed plants. In a hydroponic system plants get nitrogen from the nutrient solution. Yes by definition I am growing my microgreens hydrponicly. Hope this answers your question
    Thank ya’l for the comments

    • Where do you buy this rock wool from? I would like to trial it side by side with soil.

      Once the quail aviary is built I will have a lot of compost to work with but not huge amounts. I see a function stack on steroids here.

    • So is your hydroponic system self sustainable? i.e. fed by inputs you can generate yourself? I lost interest in hydroponics when it seemed that it would force me to buy a whole bunch of specialty inputs and especially when some of those inputs had possible health hazards (Bat dung is an inhalation hazard). This lead me towards aquaponics where all I was putting in was fish food and electricity. If I can just use compost tea for my nutrient solution that would be REALLY interesting.

  8. Trying to bring back that old country road feel… waving at cops… in my Slayer shirt. Love it!

  9. There were a couple of books on soil that Rod mentioned during the podcast that I couldn’t write down because I was driving at the time. Any chance that you could give those again? Thanks!

  10. Is there any way to reach Rod other than Facebook? (I know, I know…I’m still in the Stone Age).

    I think Jack said he was going to post something in show notes but I slept since then so I’m not certain.

  11. Would love to see some more from Rod; ditto Mike Centex’s comments. Especially about his vortex brewer. Thanks

  12. Ditto both Luke’s and Mike Centex’s comments. Want to get busy building a vortex brewer and start experimenting.