Comments

Episode-1806- Listener Feedback for 6-13-16 — 34 Comments

  1. The question is not why wasn’t there one guy with a gun, FL bars are gun free zones. The real question is why didn’t anyone rush the SOB. He had to reload, he had to give his back to someone.

    This may sound like armchair commando, but really all it would have taken was one guy to break a bar stool over his head when he wasn’t looking.

    The problem is people have been so sheltered from violence that the sound of gun shots send many cowering. I don’t blame the victims, but the mind set has to change in gun free zones like it has changed in airplanes where if anyone but hints at a hi-jacking the passengers rush the bastard.

      • I can only imagine that in the heat of the moment, there’s a lot of fear and confusion, and what seems simple after the fact, isn’t as simple. What a sad thing to have happen.

    • There was an armed guard at the nightclub that traded gunfire with shooter. I own hunting rifles and I don’t claim to know what the answer is. But I know this; a good guy with a gun doesn’t necessarily stop a bad guy with a gun.

  2. Food storage once you are on the paleo lifestyle

    Great topic.

    Been on a strict paleo diet since Nov 2012 (and feel like a billion bucks too.

    One of my ideas to to no matter what when it comes down to survival – do whatever you have to to only eat NON-WHEAT GRAINS. That’s my plan.

    • Dang knew I forgot something! Here you go, http://amzn.to/1sEyb2X

      I like this better than the power pressure cooker XL I currently have. It will only do 4 pints. This even though it says “small” will do, Cans up to four quart jars, six pint jars, eight jelly jars or ten half-pint jars in one batch.

      4 quarts is a gallon and we generally make 2.5-3 gallons of stock or soup so it is perfect because we always eat some, this means two runs and done. We start making bone stocks heavy in Sept. usually a batch a week right up till the holidays, by then we have plenty for the entire winter. This will do double the work the only reason I haven’t ordered it yet is I don’t really can in the heat of summer at all, even with this type of thing. Just too busy this time of year.

      The other great thing about the Chard is it comes with multiple petcocks so it can be used at higher elevations unlike the Chard.

  3. Jack…Build a barn..Next year build a loft apartment…It’s not a house…..You build a bathroom for the barn and you got the septic permit

    • This is what we are doing now, they’re calling them barndominiums. For now we’re building a shop to just house our camper which for now we’ll live in. Later one bay of the shop will become a 2 story apartment.

  4. Three clarifications about transporting a firearm on a airliner.

    1. Jack mentions “the only thing you need to worry about is are you going TO someplace where your firearm might be banned like New York City or Chicago.” Let me add “. . . are you going THRU someplace where your firearm might be banned. . .”
    If your connection gets screwed up and you get stuck in NYC or Chicago, you’ll have to claim your checked bags for the night. Now you’re stuck in possession of a banned firearm.

    2. Airport firearms check-in procedures are similar, but have minor variations from airport to airport. GET THERE EARLY enough to not be rushed. Very few ticket agents have experience with checking firearms, so be patient with them. The ticket counter agents may, or may not, ask you to show that the firearm is unloaded and chamber clear (no standard procedure). Then some may lead you to a special TSA screening point where you watch them prescreen the firearm case or bag, or the ticket agent may just take your bag and screen it behind the scenes (no standard proceedure). If they screen it behind the scenes make sure you listen for your name on the PA system in case the TSA doesn’t accept it. You may want to verify with the agent at the gate that they accepted your bag.

    3. You container is required to be hard sided. You probably want something two or three padlock points to make sure that the gun cannot be accessed through reasonable bending of the container. I like the hard plastic Pelican cases. The Plano rifle cases satisfy my locking point rule, but are cheap and may not hold up to baggage handler abuse. The Plano handgun cases are unsatisfactory. With only have one lock point, the case it can easily bent open without breaking it. This seems to be an obscure rule. Ask me how I know.

    It really is very easy. Read your airline website’s lists the rules for traveling with firearms. Jack’s comments are a pretty spot-on summary.

  5. Regarding flying with a firearm:

    This can be a great way to protect your items from the thieves at TSA. I first learned this from a photographer who traveled with high value equipment.

    The firearm has to be in a hard, locked case. The lock has to be a real lock, not a “TSA Approved” lock. The important info is that other things besides the firearm can be in the case, all locked up behind the big lock that only you have a key to. You can take a large footlocker style trunk with all your items in it and your firearm. Now the entire trunk is locked with your lock. It’s big and bulky so its more cumbersom for a TSA agent to walk off with. TSA can’t search it without you there to unlock it. Because it has a firearm, if they want to search it, you are required to be present, which means you can keep and eye on your stuff and relock the trunk. If I’m flying with high value items and I have to check them in, I bring a firearm as well so that I can actually lock up my items. No firearm means you can only lock your baggage with a TSA lock which they can open without you.

    If you are flying to a location that you can’t legally bring a firearm, you can still use this trick. Flare guns are legal in all 50 states. A flare gun is concidered a firearm in regards to flying, it has to be treated the same way. So if you aren’t a gun owner or you’re traveling to a place you can’t have a gun, take a flare gun, lock up all your items and thwart the the thieves at TSA by using their own rules.

    • I’ve had at least one airport (CLT) take my bags and screen without me present. That was 5 or 6 years ago, so things may have changed.

      I have not information about the rest of your comments. Seems legit tho. 😉

  6. Food storage once you are on the paleo lifestyle
    Thanks for answering this one Jack, I will check out the two back episodes as suggested. You mentioned two links to recommended pressure canners, do you have the links?

    • Here you go, http://amzn.to/1sEyb2X

      I like this better than the power pressure cooker XL I currently have. It will only do 4 pints. This even though it says “small” will do, Cans up to four quart jars, six pint jars, eight jelly jars or ten half-pint jars in one batch.

      4 quarts is a gallon and we generally make 2.5-3 gallons of stock or soup so it is perfect because we always eat some, this means two runs and done. We start making bone stocks heavy in Sept. usually a batch a week right up till the holidays, by then we have plenty for the entire winter. This will do double the work the only reason I haven’t ordered it yet is I don’t really can in the heat of summer at all, even with this type of thing. Just too busy this time of year.

      The other great thing about the Chard is it comes with multiple petcocks so it can be used at higher elevations unlike the Chard.

  7. I always recommend Deviant Ollam when people ask about transporting firearms when flying. He’s got a great video from one of his presentations at DEFCON and his website (below) is a great all in one resource for the info you need. Jack hit the big points here, but this goes into a little more detail if anybody needs it.

    http://deviating.net/firearms/packing/

  8. As far as financing goes, we found local banks in your area are WAY easier to deal with then mortgage companies. We were actually dreading the process because I am self employed and we wanted to do as much as we could on the home ourselves. Being self employed proving income was as simple as last 3 years tax return and a current balance sheet. In the end it all depends on how much the loan officer is willing to work with you. We got a loan on the land first, vacant land had to have 15% down payment. We then went back 3 months later with a sketch of what we planned to build on the land with an estimated cost. The estimated cost was put together by us. They sent that to an appraiser and wrote a loan up to 80% of what the property is expected to appraise at. We now have a year to complete everything, then we’ll close and turn it into a regular mortgage.

  9. Jack,
    This was my David Allan Coe “perfect country & western song” show! Discussed my comment AND played Pirate Looks at 40.

    I’m a year away from 40 and have felt a deep connection to the meaning of that song since I was 20. Just got back from sailing in the islands and played it a couple hundred times as I’m finally headed for the actual number. Now to hear it on the show? Sweet!

    Definitely placing my early vote for a prepper apps show in August, perhaps?

    Keep up the good work,
    Angusbangus

  10. What is the best episode to listen to regarding mass shootings, gun control attempts, causes, prevention of such things, the crazy liberals on social media at these times etc? I am an inconsistent listener and would like to hear jack’s full position. Thanks!!

  11. Re: automation and jobs.

    I try get concerned about this sometimes. I can’t. Ultimately in my mind it comes down to this: We have an economy to serve us, it produces the stuff we want to have. If it can produce just as much, or more, stuff, with less human effort, well that’s pretty low on my list of long-term concerns. This is not to say the transition won’t have it’s perils, but I don’t see an economic apocalypse in the works here.

    We can’t look at things statically, The more automation replaces the less appealing are the remaining potential applications of automation. And the more labor is available the lower the cost of labor and the more eager to please are the employees. It’s definitely coming, I was in a meeting with a bunch of engineers who design automation equipment just last week, their major challenge is developing talent fast enough to keep up with all the work they have to do. I just don’t see it being nearly as bad as articles like the one you read try to portray it.

      • Yep, and people have been “thinking” that this or that technology was going to lead to the end of economics as we know it for at least a couple centuries. I’ll believe it when I see it.

        Is the shift from the type of labor we see today to automation really that different than what we went through when human muscle-power was almost completely replaced by mechanical power? One steam shovel could and did replace 100 strong men with picks and shovels, did construction jobs disappear? Or did we start doing more and bigger jobs because of the increased productivity?

        I’m far more concerned about what the government might do to prevent, redirect, or control the coming change (such as, perhaps, your example of a guaranteed income) than dealing with the change itself. It will bring both challenges and opportunities. And those who capitalize on the opportunities will be the ones employing those who didn’t, even if it’s for jobs we can’t imagine today. (Imagine trying to explain podcasting to that 18th century shoveler).

        • @Jake,

          “Is the shift from the type of labor we see today to automation really that different than what we went through when human muscle-power was almost completely replaced by mechanical power?”

          Yes it is because that already happened and everything before it already happened. This is an end game, there is little left for people en mass to do.

          As for less jobs making labor cheaper, that too is a problem.

          Heads in the sand everywhere I turn. LOL

          Frankly 25-35% of jobs today are largely useless already. If no one did them nothing would really stop, happen, go bad, etc.

          Large companies currently have jobs that are people who justify the jobs of other people with spread sheets. It is all ending, not as an end of the world but a total complete end of the current system.

    • Yes, we may see a complete end of the current employment system. And a large percent of current jobs may be unnecessary. However, neither automation, nor the systemic change that automation/technology may cause, will limit or reduce the overall number of jobs.

      It is useful to understand a job as essentially anything someone is willing to pay a person to do. Under that definition, the availability of jobs is limited only by what humans want enough to pay for and their ability to pay for them. Automation will indeed change the type of jobs humans do, but automation itself is not a limiting factor on the overall number of jobs in society.

      Moreover, to the extent that automation increases wealth in society, it increases the ability of its members to pay for what they want (to create jobs). The new jobs paid for with the automated wealth, will merely be different than the ones done before automation.

      Since, human wants are limited only by our imagination – the imagination (wants) of even one human are essentially limitless. Thus, even one person -such as Jack himself, has the imagination sufficient to employ the entire population of the world, humans lack only the ability to pay for all the jobs (wants) that we can imagine. So the limiting factor regarding job availability is always -whether we have the wealth to pay for what we want.

      A limit or reduction of the number of jobs available (things humans want and are willing to pay for) will require either massive destruction of wealth in society or massive consolidation of wealth. Automation, has the opposite affect -it increases wealth. If the wealth exists, humans will continue to pay others (provide jobs) in order to fulfill the unending wants of our ever expansive imaginations.

      I doubt it is possible that automation would change the job environment so fast that large segments of the population have a hard time adapting to the new wants that other people have not yet automated. It is however, possible or likely, that new technology and automation could result in such a massive consolidation of power that dramatically fewer people control the ability to pay for what they want and to therefore decide who works.

      • “I doubt it is possible that automation would change the job environment so fast that large segments of the population have a hard time adapting to the new wants that other people have not yet automated.”

        Okay good luck with that.

  12. East Texas, look at the very small towns too, not just the unincorporated areas. Example my son lives in an East Texas town just over 800 people.
    He bought an existing home on 2 acres, 5 bedrooms 3 baths, 2 living areas for 150k. Last winter he decided to build a shed (more like a 2 story barn see https://twitter.com/creationix/status/712311163573252099 ) so he called his town to see if he needed a building permit. The lady who answered the phone had never been asked that question before in all her years working there. She asked the mayor to verify, yes, no building permit needed. Just do what you want. He has no plumbing in the building, but did run his own electric lines to the shop.
    Now my town which is about 3 times that size and wants building permits, garage sale permits, etc. Both towns are just a few miles apart. One clue, our city has their own brick building provides water, sewer and garbage, the other has a trailer for an office, residents have wells and septic systems.
    I also know of an unincorporated subdivision on the Arkansas side, in the middle of development, a neighboring city added a bunch of stuff they needed to add such as curbs, thicker roads (many times better than the county roads leading to the subdivision) which drove up the price of the lots and most of them are sitting there vacant. This is outside city limits but the city had some kind of pull because it was an area they considered annexing. So even unincorporated areas can have government sneak up on them. The real estate development company lost a bit of money on that deal.
    I also know of local people who subdivide their own land and finance the lots they sale. Many will live in a mobile home while they pay off the land then build. (mobile home – tornado alley – heavily wooded area – not sure it is a good idea.)
    Land is inexpensive in the East Texas area, often it is less expensive to buy an existing home than build your own and you will already have utilities on your property. If you build yourself getting insurance on the structure as you build may also be tricky, depending on how you go about it.

  13. On growing mulch:

    I have three 100′ rows of comfrey. They regrow in 3-4 weeks after cutting, so you can cut a row a week and always have mulch. Just hop on the riding mower with a bagger, and straddle the row. By the end, you have about a half yard of shredded comfrey.

    Keep in mind, this breaks down in about a week, so it’s a constant replenishment thing. It’s nice because it’s perennial, fast growing, does amazing things with fertility, and you can propagate as much as you need. 1 cutting can fill an acre in 5 years if you just keep splitting it.

    I also use wood chips, it’s not a replacement of it.

    On Glympse, I prefer Life360 as an alternative. Similar features, a bit wider spread, comes with roadside assistance as part of the package, and the CEO is actually a respectable guy.
    https://pando.com/2014/05/17/dear-piece-of-shit-life360-ceo-sends-a-refreshingly-direct-response-to-a-patent-troll/

  14. Re: Whether or not to vote for the UK to leave the EU

    Here’s an excellent piece I came across today addressing that very question. The solution in the end is to ignore the equation of a Brexit with the reactionary forces that are getting the press, and to instead realize that it’s a step toward decentralization, which is a good thing.

    Why Global Capital Fears ‘Brexit’

  15. Roehrman MT Knives Stakeholder Knife Bonus Spirko Survival Podcast Silver Proof – from Ebay (Jack’s Link, above) – $2,551 winning bid (of 50 bids) on June 19, 2016. Wow.