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Episode-2711- 24 Bullet Proof Plants for the Back Yard Hunter Gatherer — 7 Comments

  1. I think it was in this podcast (I binged on The Survival Podcast yesterday) that you mentioned tomato leaves being edible — good to know since tomatoes are scarce on my plants this season, I can justify their existence this year!  What about for chickens? Tomato leaves are on most lists of no-nos for chickens that I’ve seen. Yay or nay?

    • Cloves from grocery garlic grow and grow really well in most instances.  They don’t grow “wild garlic” though, they grow exactly what they are, they are basically clones.  I generally put all the little fiddly cloves in my wicking beds and ebb and flow beds.   I use the green tops like chives vs, growing them to maturity.

      Honestly wild garlic is a generic term for a ton of different plants in the allium family (onions, ramps, garlic, chives).   Most are more accurately a wild onion but they almost all smell and taste like garlic (with the exception of ramps).

      It is an incredibly common plant easiest to id and harvest in mid/late winter or very early spring.   It is very frost tolerant so you can often find tons of it in like park areas, rest stops, etc. where lawns are maintained but not chemlawned.  Again think camp grounds, rest stops, trail heads, picnic areas, etc.

      The reason is these areas are seldom mowed in the winter and the garlics come up before the grass all comes back so it sticks out.  The areas are often irrigated and pretty easy to pull bulbs up from.   Then just bring it hope and plant it.  Later in the year it goes to flower and produces tiny bulblets above ground (like a walking onion), these you can plant like seed.

      If you plant the below ground part you get a copy of the mother plant.  If you plant the above ground bublets you get what ever it may be.  It may be pollinated with the exact same type or it may be  a hybrid, of course all wild plants are massively hybridized.   I have tried to get as much as I can on my property.  How the hell it survives the droughts of summer IDK but it does and each spring 5-6 very different varieties have taken hold and pop up and do their thing.

      You can find it on etsy and ebay and such some times but no way to know what you are really getting unless you contact the seller, ask them how they source and they tell you the truth.  I’d bet someone on the forum or our MeWe group could get you some and send it to you if you don’t have it around.  My bet is it is all over once you know what to look for.   Unless you live in the desert or tundra it is within miles of your house gaurnteed.

  2. Going to be trying a few of these in the UK next year.

    Wondering what is the name of the variety of purple potato so that I can try to source it in the UK?

    Thanks

     

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