Tag Archives: unusual edibles

Pickerel Rush an Edible and Beautiful Plant for Your Water Garden

Big thanks to Nick Burtner at School of Permaculture (https://schoolofpermaculture.com) for posting about this plant being edible on Facebook.

Been growing it for years and never knew it was that type of resource.  The seeds are pretty good raw, I would say adding them to salads would be a good use, I am going to try toasting them gently to crisp them up a bit and bring out more flavor, when I do I will report back to you guys on the results.

Also here is a video by Green Dean on using this plant for edible purposes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sKy6Ivh0HaE

Episode-1120- Designing Small Scale Forest Gardens

juju

The Jujube or Chinese Date – A Great Small Tree for Forest Gardens

At the presentation I just did at the Self Reliance Expo there were two main things people had major questions about when it comes to food forestry.  The first was “what trees and plants work in Texas” and that really is what will work in most of the US.  The second is how does this all apply to a small back yard or smaller piece of land.

Now the new video Geoff Lawton just released shows what can be done, including with trees in small backyards.  This videos leads off with a back yard that is only 640SF.  Of course the first thing people ask then is, but what about our climate that is in the sub tropics.  Um, did anyone but me notice the main trees in the system where apples?

That said I understand, it does often seem that many of the guilds (plant groupings) in Permaculture are geared to the subtropics and tropics.  Ironically the first work on Permaculture “Permaculture One” is actually geared almost 100% to temperate climates.  Today I am going to try to take this all down in size and simplify the concepts and explain how they really will work anywhere.

Join Me Today As We Discuss…

  • Small Land Holding Advantages
    • Can be irrigated
    • Easy to intensively manage
    • Contain their own micro climates (easy to create more)
    • Most work can be done by hand (build and manage)
    • Are the most productive per square foot on the planet
    • Do not attract attention and easy to secure
    • Nitrogen fixers are not as critical (still a good idea)
  • Things that are different from typical food forestry
    • The layers are scaled down
    • The number of support species are reduced
    • There are few “sacrificial plantings”
    • They don’t require swales or chickens but both are welcome
    • Small ponds and barrels are easily fed with roof catchment
  • Special Considerations that Open Your Options Up
    • Shape isn’t critical, do what works
    • Solar aspect is a major concern, but work with it
    • Put in more irrigation then you think you will ever need
    • Consider ponds, please consider ponds
    • Think about power (solar first but grid is better then nothing)
    • You can plant a LOT closer and a LOT more dense then you think
    • If you have animals design in their nutrient flow
    • In a larger space build “glades” and maximize the edges
    • Build structures for your vines they can otherwise dominate a small system
    • Fertilize (organically) a lot early on
    • Mulch and chop and drop like crazy
  • Trees to consider for North America
    • Apple
    • Plumb
    • Peach
    • Filbert/Hazelnut
    • Chinese Chestnut
    • Almond
    • Jujube
    • Persimmon
    • Edible Dogwoods
    • Pears
    • Cherry
    • Paw Paw
    • Medlars
    • Mulberry
    • Figs
  • Bushes and Shrubs to Consider
    • Blueberry
    • Blackberry
    • Raspberry
    • Wolfberry/Goji Berry
    • Elderberry
    • Gooseberry
    • Currants
    • Goumi
    • Autumn Olive
    • Sea Buckthorn
    • Blue Honeysuckle
    • Aronia
    • High Bush Cranberry
  • Ground Covers
    • Strawberry
    • Sweet Potato
    • Wintergreen
    • Salal
    • Emerald Carpet
    • Thyme (trailing)
    • Cranberry
    • Plant Anything Dense Enough and it is Ground Cover
  • Vines
    • Grapes
    • Kiwi
    • Hops
    • Porcelainberry
    • Magnolia Vine
    • Maypop
  • Other Plants to Consider
    • Large Hip Heirloom Roses
    • Chilean or Pineapple Guava
    • Herbs of all types especially Parsley and Basil
    • Flowers of all types
    • Plant annuals directly into the sunny spots in and around this system
    • Bamboos
    • Honestly anything you want

Resources for Today’s Show…

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK and you might hear yourself on the air.

Episode-945- Weeds that aren’t Weeds and Other Unusal Edibles

Nope it isn't Lambsquarters it is Huauzontle (Wah-Zont-Lay)

Nope it isn’t Lambsquarters it is Huauzontle (Wah-Zont-Lay)

Recently I posted a photo on facebook included here in the show notes.  The photo is of a plant called huauzontle (pronounced wah-zont-lay), a relative of lambsquarters.  While only one person guessing the plant species got it right what actually surprised me was they crescendo of the use of the word “weed”.

Sometimes I sit and wonder if tomatoes and peppers and lettuce just grew in large swaths on their own would we call them weed too?  For example this so called weed huauzontle has actually been cultivated for centuries and is currently “en vogue” with many Mexican gardeners in LA.

I find it interesting that many of the plants I purposely plant in my garden like lambsquartes, huauzontle and purslane are classified as weeds by so many others.  Am I just so weirdo that likes “weeds” or is there something more to it?  Many of these plants are great eating, easy to cultivate and pack a great nutritional punch.  Many are also great for livestock, wildlife support, predator habitat and still others do all of the above.

Join Me Today As We Discuss the Merits of These Unusual Edible Plants

Resources for Today’s Show

Some of My Favorite Small Seed Suppliers to Find Unusual StuffThese are a group of small seed houses where I have found many unusual and all but lost to time seed varieties and species.

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK and you might hear yourself on the air.