Tag Archives: homesteading

Episode-1830- Power Tools for the Homestead

Paslode 902000 and Electric Nail Gun that Can Handle Up To 2.5 Inch 16 Gauge Nails

Paslode 902000 a Cordless Electric Nail Gun that Can Handle Up To 2.5 Inch 16 Gauge Nails

Today we continue our listener voted on Tuesday shows, the poll for the current live voting is here, where you can vote on August’s Tuesday shows.

Today we look at power tools for the homestead.  I want to be clear on that concept, for the homestead, not for the wood shop.  Now there are tools that do belong in both locations, but I am talking day to day and project based homesteading stuff here, not cabinet making or something like that.

The tools I want to talk about today are the tools that I think should be on every homestead from small to large.  The things you will find yourself using monthly if not weekly.  It seems something always needs fixing or building on a homestead.

I will give some specific brand recommendations today and even some product specific links, but I want to be honest, most power tools today are quite well made and you generally get what you pay for.  So don’t feel you have to be like me and bleed Dewalt yellow in your brand loyalty.

In the list I don’t make a big differentiation between cordless and plug in tools, in the show though I will talk a lot about the trade offs between each of them.

Join Me Today To Hear About

  • Homestead tools vs. “wood shop tools”, etc.
  • The homestead environment
    • Project based
    • Stuff breaks
    • Always short on time
  • The thirteen tools I think every homesteader needs
    • Drill
    • Reciprocating Saw
    • Circular Saw
    • Jig Saw
    • Chop Saw
    • Nail Gun
    • Air Compressor
    • Impact Driver
    • Bench Grinder
    • Rotary Tool (Dremel)
    • Angle Grinder
    • Chainsaw
  • Thoughts on pawnshop, low end brands, etc.
  • Final thoughts

Resources for today’s show…

Tools Mentioned on the Show Today

Note – I own all three of the chainsaws listed and recommend them all based on your needs and experience.  The electrics are way less maintenance.  I also own the first generation of the cordless Oregon saw and can say the second generation is a big improvement on an already great saw.

Sponsors of the Day

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK (866-658-4465) and you might hear yourself on the air.

Also remember we have an expert council that can answer you questions. If you have a question send it to jack at thesurvivalpodcast.com with TSPC Epert in the subject line. Ask your question in one to two sentences so it is clear then provide any additional details. Make sure to tell me what council member the question is for. You Meet the Expert Council at this Link.

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Episode-1813- Make Mead Like a Viking with Jereme Zimmerman

Making Mead Like A Viking

Making Mead Like A Viking

Jereme Zimmerman is a writer who lives in Berea, Kentucky. He was raised and home schooled in northern Kentucky on Twin Meadows Nubian Goat Farm. He spent more than seven years living and traveling throughout the Pacific Northwest, where he returns regularly.

After brewing beer using conventional modern methods for several years he became fascinated with emulating ancient brewing practices, which in-turn led to his interest in learning how to brew with local, organic, and wild-foraged ingredients.

Jereme documents his research into ancient brewing and muses on the homesteading life at Earthineer.com (as RedHeadedYeti), and through articles with magazines such as Backwoods Home, New Pioneer, American Frontiersman and Hobby Farms.

He is the author of the book Make Mead Like a Viking, published by Chelsea Green Publishing in November 2015. He is a popular workshop facilitator and presents regularly at Mother Earth News Fairs.

Jereme joins us today to discuss his methods of making mead, his book, using natural and wild crafted ingredients, open fermentation and more.

Resources for today’s show…

Sponsors of the Day

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK (866-658-4465) and you might hear yourself on the air.

Also remember we have an expert council that can answer you questions. If you have a question send it to jack at thesurvivalpodcast.com with TSPC Epert in the subject line. Ask your question in one to two sentences so it is clear then provide any additional details. Make sure to tell me what council member the question is for. You Meet the Expert Council at this Link.

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Episode-1788- Finding the Right Property to Turn Into a Homestead

The Urban Rural Fringe is Often a Homesteading Sweetspot

The Urban Rural Fringe is Often a Homesteading Sweetspot

In case you have not be paying attention for the last 15 years, news flash, homesteading is once again very popular.  From tiny urban homesteads (sue me Dervaes family go for it!) to mid sized small acreages to properties with a “back 40” and everything in between.

Why?  America and much of the modern world is starting to realize how hollow what we call “progress” really is.  They are realizing that a house that eats up 30% or more of monthly income while giving nothing back as a status symbol, doesn’t really make your life better.

Our nation was founded as a nation of homesteaders, again from big to small properties but almost every American not so long ago was using their land to provide for them.  I feel we are returning to that mind set, at least a large number of us are.  Today we look at finding that right property, what to look for, how to evaluate it, how to approach things so you don’t get in over your head or make costly type one errors.

Join Me Today to Discuss…

  • Everything I said about buying property in the BOL episode applies here
  • A quick update on a listener who was willing to walk away and what happened
  • What is the difference between a home and a homestead
    • Homesteads produce vs. consume your resources
    • Homesteads are multi functional
    • Homesteads are generally planned for long term ownership
    • Homesteads are created by their owners, not a “builder”
  • What to look for in a homestead
    • Size, its up to you but think hard about this
    • Locations
      • Urban/Suburban
      • Urban Rural Fringe (sweet spot)
      • Rural
      • Remote
    • Thinking about food production
      • Don’t be married to large numbers of livestock
      • Consider home scale animal solutions
        • Quail
        • Rabbits
        • Chickens
        • Ducks
      • Food production from plant sources
        • Annual gardens
        • Perennial plantings
        • Mushroom production
      • Consider your lifestyle
        • Working a job
        • Working from home
        • Home based business
        • Full time homesteader/homestead business
    • If you want freedom, define it
      • No HOAs
      • Check, double check, codes, zoning, laws
      • Evaluate the neighborhood with a critical eye
    • Economics
      • Things you almost always pay less for if they are already there
        • Outbuildings
        • Ponds
        • Fencing
        • Roofing
        • Almost all infrastructure
      • Things  you tend to pay more for if they are already done
        • Carpet
        • Paint
        • Kitchens
        • Bathrooms
      • Things you should usually not get into your head
        • Additions
        • Removing walls
    • In the end, you can do this almost anywhere, define your dream

Resources for today’s show…

Sponsors of the Day

 

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK (866-658-4465) and you might hear yourself on the air.

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Episode-1618- Joe Mooney on DIY for Fun, Prep, Homesteading and Profit

Check Out Joe Mooney's Awesome Youtube Channel "HomesteadEconomics"

Check Out Joe Mooney’s Awesome Youtube Channel “HomesteadEconomics”

Joe Mooney is a passionate advocate for becoming more self-reliant and learning through DIY self-education. While a firefighter by trade, he is a DIY project junkie and amateur homesteader by passion. Growing up in both rural and urban areas around the US, Joe now calls his rural ‘homestead’ in the Arizona desert home. He and his family live off of 90% rainwater, collected from their roof and are always looking for new ways to become more self-reliant and live a more satisfying and healthy life.

Joe maintains a YouTube channel called “Homesteadonomics” that chronicles many of his DIY projects and homesteading activities. He considers his channel a means to teach others how he does projects on his homestead as well as increasing his own self-education in the process.

Subjects are wide ranging and include rainwater harvesting, desert gardening, chicken and beekeeping, alternative income sources, DIY home repair, leather/kydex work, various pallet projects and a rather large combination of other odd how to projects.

In true homesteading fashion, Joe’s projects and homesteading activities also serve to provide additional income as well as hone future skill sets in various disciplines. In addition to making videos, Joe has written articles for backwoods home and sometimes moonlights as a craftsman of odd projects that he sells on craigslist.com

Resources for today’s show…

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK (866-658-4465) and you might hear yourself on the air.

Also remember we have an expert council you can address your calls to. If you do this you should email me right after your call at jack at thesurvivalpodcast.com with expert council call in the subject line. In the body of your email tell me that you just called in a question for the council and what number you called in from. I will then give the call priority when I screen calls.

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Episode-1592- Ben Hewitt on Nutrient Dense Food Production

Click Here to Buy a Copy of Ben's Book

Click Here to Buy a Copy of Ben’s Book

Ben and his wife, Penny, along with their two sons, have transformed a worn out Vermont hillside into a thriving homestead, which currently provides more than 90% of their food, along with most of their building materials, all their heating and cooking fuel, and many other essentials.

They call their style of homestead scale food production “practiculture,” reflecting the fact that they draw on many different methodologies while always striving to make this work “doable.” They are the authors of the recently-published book The Nourishing Homestead.

Ben’s previous book is Home Grown, which explores his experience with the public ed system (he’s a high school dropout) and his family’s experiences “unschooling” their two sons.

Ben joins us today to discuss Homestead-scale nutrient dense food production and what he calls practiculture.  To go into how to make your food nutrient dense, what that actually means and why it is important.  As well as discussing his new book, “The Nourishing Homestead“.

Join Us Today to Discuss…

  • What exactly is nutrient density and why it matters
  • The connection between soil health and human health
  • The relationship between big pharma and big food
  • What it’s like to grow and process 90%+ of your own food,
  • What Ben’s days and diet looks like
  • The difference between independence and interdependence
  • The essential role of livestock in a healthy homestead/farm eco-system
  • What the hell is “practiculture,” anyway do we really need another freaking word

Resources for today’s show…

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK (866-658-4465) and you might hear yourself on the air.

Join the MSB Today

Join the MSB Today

Want Every Episode of TSP Ever Produced?

Remember in addition to discounts to over 40 vendors who supply stuff you are likely buying anyway, tons of free ebooks and video content, MSB Members also get every edition of The Survival Podcast ever produced in convenient zip files in blocks of 24. More info on the MSB can be found here.

Episode-1568- 15 Underrated Plants for the Homestead

An Elder Planted From a Single Rooted Cutting in Its' Second Season.  The Bamboo Stake is 6.5 Feet Tall!

An Elder Planted From a Single Rooted Cutting in Its’ Second Season. The Bamboo Stake is 6.5 Feet Tall!

Yesterday we had a fascinating discussion on the Facebook Regarians page about Mulberry, I know it is awesome, I am growing a lot of varieties but I didn’t realize how much it could really do.   In fact I considered just doing a show today called something like Magnificent Mulberries, because they do so much.  I simply realized though that I can’t take in enough on them this morning alone to do them justice, so that might come at a later date.

I mean if you just begin to look into the above linked discussion the sheer volume of data is insane.  So I decided instead simply to include it in a list of really useful but underrated plants by homesteaders and permaculturists.

What I tried to do with this list is be highly variable.  To provide things a person might grow for cattle or goats on a large scale but at the same time provide things that you might grow on a small lot.   Most not all but most of these you will have heard of before.  It isn’t that they are unknowing just that their full usefulness is largely unknown.

Join Me Today As We Discuss…

  • The marvelous mulberry
  • The elderberry, it is for more than just wine
  • Lemon balm, stop trying to grow citrus grow the flavor
  • Blackberry, so many uses, it will shock you
  • Medlar, what, med what, you will really like this one
  • Wild garlic, wild onion and garlic and onion chives
  • Lavender it is more then just something that smells nice
  • Jujube tough as nails, storable, highly sought by some
  • Roses wild varieties and old varieties
  • Native persimmon not just for people
  • Jute Mallow edible, naturalizes, asks almost nothing in return
  • Lambsquarters eat it when it is small, mulch it when it gets too big
  • Amaranth the seed is one yield the leaf is often a better one
  • Bee Balm you get tea, you get beneficial insects and it won’t die
  • Mints come one come all, from tea to candy, to salads to good adult beverages

Resources for today’s show…

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK (866-658-4465) and you might hear yourself on the air.

Also remember we have an expert council you can address your calls to. If you do this you should email me right after your call at jack at thesurvivalpodcast.com with expert council call in the subject line. In the body of your email tell me that you just called in a question for the council and what number you called in from. I will then give the call priority when I screen calls.

Join the MSB Today

Join the MSB Today

Want Every Episode of TSP Ever Produced?

Remember in addition to discounts to over 40 vendors who supply stuff you are likely buying anyway, tons of free ebooks and video content, MSB Members also get every edition of The Survival Podcast ever produced in convenient zip files in blocks of 24. More info on the MSB can be found here.

Episode-1508- Building with Shipping Containers

Learn More about Chuck's Cabin at the TSP Forum

Learn More about Chuck’s Cabin at the TSP Forum

Chuck (Uzi4U2 on the TSP forum) has built a cabin from shipping containers in the northern Ozarks of Missouri. He spent 15 years in the Marine Corps as an NBC specialist and then Chief Warrant Officer.

Chuck served in Dessert Storm, the beginning stages of OIF and has spent considerable time on and near sea ports.

He has an Associates Degree in Criminal Justice and a Bachelor’s in Information System Management. He shoots as often as he can get away, and reloads and casts his own bullets to feed his hobby. Lastly, he is an Eagle Scout, which really began his interest in “Being Prepared”.

One day he decided to make a go of building a cabin from shipping containers.  He also started a thread at the TSP forum chronicling his adventure that has become very popular.  So he is joining us today to discuss how his project has gone, what worked well, what didn’t and how you can use shipping containers for your own projects.

He Joins Us Today to Discuss Building with Shipping Containers and Answer Questions Like…

  • What exactly is a shipping container
  • What is their history / how did they originate
  • What are the dimensions of a basic shipping container
  • What types are there, and what features do they share
  • What are the strengths and weaknesses a container
  • What are the pro’s and con’s of using a shipping container for construction
  • What things go into the design criteria for a good shipping container structure
  • How did you build yours
  • What are some basic designs that would be simple to put together
  • Can I bury a shipping container more importantly should you

Resources for today’s show…

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK (866-658-4465) and you might hear yourself on the air.

Also remember we have an expert council you can address your calls to. If you do this you should email me right after your call at jack at thesurvivalpodcast.com with expert council call in the subject line. In the body of your email tell me that you just called in a question for the council and what number you called in from. I will then give the call priority when I screen calls.

Join the MSB Today

Join the MSB Today

Want Every Episode of TSP Ever Produced?

Remember in addition to discounts to over 40 vendors who supply stuff you are likely buying anyway, tons of free ebooks and video content, MSB Members also get every edition of The Survival Podcast ever produced in convenient zip files in blocks of 24. More info on the MSB can be found here.

Episode-1493- Adventures in Raising Ducks

Duck's Pack Like Behavior Makes Management Easy

A Duck’s Pack Like Behavior Makes Management Easy

Our duck activities have garnered a lot of requests for a full show on just ducks.  So today I will do my best.  I have been reluctant to do so for a few reasons.  The first is ducks are a new thing to me. I  grew up caring at least at times for chickens and geese.  I know their requirements well.

While I observed lots of semi wild muscovies in Florida, I was not responsible for their care other than feeding them surplus fishing bait.  As of right now my direct experience in duck husbandry is about 8 months long.  This spring we purchased our little ducks, we lost some but now we have 25 happy adults.  I have had good results but credit the ducks more than myself with that.

Leading me to the second reason, there just isn’t much to it unless you go out of your way to create work for yourself.  Rain and cold can kill a chicken, it makes a duck happy.  Ducks travel in groups, if you get one headed the right direction, pretty much everyone follows.  They forage, they eat, they poop, they quack and they lay eggs.  Unless you are breeding show quality birds or something there isn’t a lot to it.  At least that is how it feels at times.

Join Me Today to Discuss…

  • Why the duck is much easier to care for than a chicken
    • Loves cold
    • Loves rain
    • Easy to fence
    • Light on land
    • Herding is possible
    • Hunts as a pack
    • Cool manure
    • Creature of habit and routine
  • The not so great side of ducks
    • Messy
    • Single minded stubborness
    • Noisy
    • Creature of habit and routine
  • Duck breeds I am working with
    • Cayugas
    • Hybrid Layers
    • Rouens
    • Runners (various)
    • Khaki Campbell
    • Swedish (may be?)
    • Muscovy
  • Best All Around Breeds (my opinion based on research)
    • Meat – Pekins or Grimaud Hybrid Pekin – Jumbo Pekin
    • Eggs – Hybrid 300 Layers (gold or white)
    • Self Propagating Dual Purpose – Muscovy
    • Dual Purpose – Buff (aka Buff Orpington)
  • Duck eggs and why they rock
    • Ducks are born with 1500 ovum vs. the 1000 of a chicken
    • Ducks are good layers for 3-4 seasons
    • 6x the Vitamin D, 2x the Vitamin A, of chickens
    • 2x the cholesterol in duck eggs vs chicken eggs (good cholesterol)
    • Higher fat and energy content (good fat)
    • Thick, viscus yolks (beautiful over easy/medium)
    • Better for baking if that is your thing
    • Less likely to break yolks, or accidentally crack one
  • The basics of raising and managing ducks
    • “Experts say space the same as chickens
    • 4 sf per duck in “coop” 10 sf per duck in “yard”
    • Ducks don’t “perch” except for muscovies (sometimes)
    • Fencing can be 3 feet high except for muscovies (sometimes)
    • I don’t use laying boxes because the ducks don’t seem to care
    • Generally most eggs are laid by 730ish am
    • Provide water, they shit it up FAST
    • A ducks personality tends to be the sum of its flock personality
  • Hatching young ducks
    • If you can get a mom to do it, let her do it
    • Incubation is the same as chickens, it just takes longer
    • Store eggs for up to 10 days, then start all of them together
    • Day 1-25 99.5 turn 7 times a day, Day 26-28 98.5 no turning
    • Day 1-33 99.5 turn 7 times a day, Day 33-35 98.5 no turning (muscovy)
  • Brooding young ducks
    • Expect to brood for 3-5 weeks depending on season
    • Provide heat on one end of brooder
    • Spend a lot of time with them if you want them “tame”
    • Feed them chick starter
    • They can go into a “tractor” in good weather as early as 2 weeks
    • Do not introduce them to the main flock until they are at least 60% grown
    • Develop a drain system for water
    • No “bathing water” until 2 weeks
    • They MUST be able to dunk their heads in water
    • Some will die, accept it
  • Final thoughts
    • If you incubate get a good incubator
    • Beware of “Tractor Supply Disease”
    • eFowl and Metzer are great places to order
    • Just do it, it isn’t hard

Resources for today’s show…

fuyuBob Wells Plant of the Week – Fuyu Persimmon – The Fuyu Persimmon tree is highly adaptable from zone 7 to zone 10.

They are medium size, flat shape, still crunchy when ripe, non-astringent.  This means “bletting” isn’t required.

Cool or hot climate. Hardy, attractive tree, practically pest free. It ripens in the fall and is Self-fruitful.

Find this plant and more at BobWellsNursery.com Bob Wells Nursery specializes in anything edible: Fruit trees, Berry Plants, Nut Trees, as well as the hard to find Specialty Trees.

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK (866-658-4465) and you might hear yourself on the air.

Also remember we have an expert council you can address your calls to. If you do this you should email me right after your call at jack at thesurvivalpodcast.com with expert council call in the subject line. In the body of your email tell me that you just called in a question for the council and what number you called in from. I will then give the call priority when I screen calls.

Join the MSB Today

Join the MSB Today

Want Every Episode of TSP Ever Produced?

Remember in addition to discounts to over 40 vendors who supply stuff you are likely buying anyway, tons of free ebooks and video content, MSB Members also get every edition of The Survival Podcast ever produced in convenient zip files in blocks of 24. More info on the MSB can be found here.

Episode-1451- Rapid Fire Q&A on Homesteading From Facebook

Check out the TSP Facebook Page

Check out the TSP Facebook Page

Late yesterday I did this post on facebook asking for any and all questions that are permaculture/homestead related.  The plan was to do a rapid fire q and a style show.

A this point I will say I will do my best, the post garnered over 150 comments in less than  12 hours time!  Some of the questions are easy, some are so complex as to require research and or a full show to cover them.  So I will pick and choose and do as many as I can do today.

If you haven’t liked the TSP Facebook Page this post is just one example of why you should.  I put out a lot of information and lots of just fun stuff for the TSP community on facebook.  Sometimes I leak information, and/or do a sale on facebook and twitter.  You just never know.

A lot of times when I put videos on YouTube I mention them on Facebook and Twitter long before they get posted to the TSP site.  Just like I did yesterday with my latest videos on the Red Pharaoh Chicken.

Due to the number of questions responded to I will not post them in the show notes, you can refer to the post on facebook if you want to say something directly to the person who asked the question or get a feel for how many questions were asked beyond my ability to respond to them.

Resources for today’s show…

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK (866-658-4465) and you might hear yourself on the air.

Also remember we have an expert council you can address your calls to. If you do this you should email me right after your call at jack at thesurvivalpodcast.com with expert council call in the subject line. In the body of your email tell me that you just called in a question for the council and what number you called in from. I will then give the call priority when I screen calls.

Join the MSB Today

Join the MSB Today

Want Every Episode of TSP Ever Produced?

Remember in addition to discounts to over 40 vendors who supply stuff you are likely buying anyway, tons of free ebooks and video content, MSB Members also get every edition of The Survival Podcast ever produced in convenient zip files in blocks of 24. More info on the MSB can be found here.

Episode-1450- TSP Homestead Lessons and Planning – Fall 2014

Three Bee Hives - One of Many Additions to the Homestead in 2014

Three Bee Hives – One of Many Additions to the Homestead in 2014

This is a great time of the year to look back at 2014 and begin fall/winter planning as well.  2014 was a big and very active year at the TSP ranch.

It also saw the launch of PermaEthos, AgriTrue, the TSP Wiki, SchoolStupidity.com and now we will soon be releasing  GenForward.com.

While I will talk a little bit about those things today I really want to focus mostly on the on the ground homestead improvements and lessons.  We now have a very large flock of chickens and a pretty good sized group of ducks.  The exciting part is our ducks are now laying eggs and I am absolutely in love with fresh duck eggs.

I also broke down and installed some “conventional garden beds” but I have already decided on a intensive polyculture model for them.  I have completed my sorghum trials and selected a variety to attempt to naturalize on the homestead and more.

Join Me Today As I Discuss…

  • The rise of the red pharaoh chicken
  • Ducks the gentle on the land birds still do some damage
  • The ducks also seem to lay enough and grow fast enough to be a good meat source
  • Geese these guys might all be legs up in an oven by years end, except for Buddy
  • Jute Mallow will self reseed in my climate, sowing is better though
  • The sorghum trials are in, Mennonite for the win, the contestants were
    • Black Amber – grows great, birds don’t love it though
    • Giant White African, huge yields but falls over
    • Tarahumara doesn’t self reseed as well as the others
    • Mennonite birds love it, compact, reseeds, coppices well for 2 crops
  • Plant propagation is like printing money
  • Don’t skimp on the “support trees” and get over the density concerns
  • Pop up green houses suck, time to build a real one
  • Wolf Berry is fricken tough as nails and easy to propagate
  • Dwarf Mulberry is awesome
  • My best trees and bushes to grow are
    • Apple
    • Peach
    • Plum
    • Mulberry
    • Jujube
    • Autumn Olive and Goumi
    • Elders in the right locations
  • Currants will grow in Texas in a “Goldy Locks spot”
  • If there are to be blueberries, they must be in a container
  • Some new things I am going to try
    • White clover as a ground cover
    • Sowing more vegetables in the food forest
    • Better irrigation systems
    • The beginnings of a full property “fedge” system
    • A controlled Red Pharaoh breeding program
    • Horse poop on contour (yes I am serious)
  • The biggest lesson, as soon as you find the “best way” you find a better way

Resources for today’s show…

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK (866-658-4465) and you might hear yourself on the air.

Also remember we have an expert council you can address your calls to. If you do this you should email me right after your call at jack at thesurvivalpodcast.com with expert council call in the subject line. In the body of your email tell me that you just called in a question for the council and what number you called in from. I will then give the call priority when I screen calls.

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Remember in addition to discounts to over 40 vendors who supply stuff you are likely buying anyway, tons of free ebooks and video content, MSB Members also get every edition of The Survival Podcast ever produced in convenient zip files in blocks of 24. More info on the MSB can be found here.