Tag Archives: homesteading

Episode-1568- 15 Underrated Plants for the Homestead

An Elder Planted From a Single Rooted Cutting in Its' Second Season.  The Bamboo Stake is 6.5 Feet Tall!

An Elder Planted From a Single Rooted Cutting in Its’ Second Season. The Bamboo Stake is 6.5 Feet Tall!

Yesterday we had a fascinating discussion on the Facebook Regarians page about Mulberry, I know it is awesome, I am growing a lot of varieties but I didn’t realize how much it could really do.   In fact I considered just doing a show today called something like Magnificent Mulberries, because they do so much.  I simply realized though that I can’t take in enough on them this morning alone to do them justice, so that might come at a later date.

I mean if you just begin to look into the above linked discussion the sheer volume of data is insane.  So I decided instead simply to include it in a list of really useful but underrated plants by homesteaders and permaculturists.

What I tried to do with this list is be highly variable.  To provide things a person might grow for cattle or goats on a large scale but at the same time provide things that you might grow on a small lot.   Most not all but most of these you will have heard of before.  It isn’t that they are unknowing just that their full usefulness is largely unknown.

Join Me Today As We Discuss…

  • The marvelous mulberry
  • The elderberry, it is for more than just wine
  • Lemon balm, stop trying to grow citrus grow the flavor
  • Blackberry, so many uses, it will shock you
  • Medlar, what, med what, you will really like this one
  • Wild garlic, wild onion and garlic and onion chives
  • Lavender it is more then just something that smells nice
  • Jujube tough as nails, storable, highly sought by some
  • Roses wild varieties and old varieties
  • Native persimmon not just for people
  • Jute Mallow edible, naturalizes, asks almost nothing in return
  • Lambsquarters eat it when it is small, mulch it when it gets too big
  • Amaranth the seed is one yield the leaf is often a better one
  • Bee Balm you get tea, you get beneficial insects and it won’t die
  • Mints come one come all, from tea to candy, to salads to good adult beverages

Resources for today’s show…

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK (866-658-4465) and you might hear yourself on the air.

Also remember we have an expert council you can address your calls to. If you do this you should email me right after your call at jack at thesurvivalpodcast.com with expert council call in the subject line. In the body of your email tell me that you just called in a question for the council and what number you called in from. I will then give the call priority when I screen calls.

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Episode-1508- Building with Shipping Containers

Learn More about Chuck's Cabin at the TSP Forum

Learn More about Chuck’s Cabin at the TSP Forum

Chuck (Uzi4U2 on the TSP forum) has built a cabin from shipping containers in the northern Ozarks of Missouri. He spent 15 years in the Marine Corps as an NBC specialist and then Chief Warrant Officer.

Chuck served in Dessert Storm, the beginning stages of OIF and has spent considerable time on and near sea ports.

He has an Associates Degree in Criminal Justice and a Bachelor’s in Information System Management. He shoots as often as he can get away, and reloads and casts his own bullets to feed his hobby. Lastly, he is an Eagle Scout, which really began his interest in “Being Prepared”.

One day he decided to make a go of building a cabin from shipping containers.  He also started a thread at the TSP forum chronicling his adventure that has become very popular.  So he is joining us today to discuss how his project has gone, what worked well, what didn’t and how you can use shipping containers for your own projects.

He Joins Us Today to Discuss Building with Shipping Containers and Answer Questions Like…

  • What exactly is a shipping container
  • What is their history / how did they originate
  • What are the dimensions of a basic shipping container
  • What types are there, and what features do they share
  • What are the strengths and weaknesses a container
  • What are the pro’s and con’s of using a shipping container for construction
  • What things go into the design criteria for a good shipping container structure
  • How did you build yours
  • What are some basic designs that would be simple to put together
  • Can I bury a shipping container more importantly should you

Resources for today’s show…

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK (866-658-4465) and you might hear yourself on the air.

Also remember we have an expert council you can address your calls to. If you do this you should email me right after your call at jack at thesurvivalpodcast.com with expert council call in the subject line. In the body of your email tell me that you just called in a question for the council and what number you called in from. I will then give the call priority when I screen calls.

Join the MSB Today

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Episode-1493- Adventures in Raising Ducks

Duck's Pack Like Behavior Makes Management Easy

A Duck’s Pack Like Behavior Makes Management Easy

Our duck activities have garnered a lot of requests for a full show on just ducks.  So today I will do my best.  I have been reluctant to do so for a few reasons.  The first is ducks are a new thing to me. I  grew up caring at least at times for chickens and geese.  I know their requirements well.

While I observed lots of semi wild muscovies in Florida, I was not responsible for their care other than feeding them surplus fishing bait.  As of right now my direct experience in duck husbandry is about 8 months long.  This spring we purchased our little ducks, we lost some but now we have 25 happy adults.  I have had good results but credit the ducks more than myself with that.

Leading me to the second reason, there just isn’t much to it unless you go out of your way to create work for yourself.  Rain and cold can kill a chicken, it makes a duck happy.  Ducks travel in groups, if you get one headed the right direction, pretty much everyone follows.  They forage, they eat, they poop, they quack and they lay eggs.  Unless you are breeding show quality birds or something there isn’t a lot to it.  At least that is how it feels at times.

Join Me Today to Discuss…

  • Why the duck is much easier to care for than a chicken
    • Loves cold
    • Loves rain
    • Easy to fence
    • Light on land
    • Herding is possible
    • Hunts as a pack
    • Cool manure
    • Creature of habit and routine
  • The not so great side of ducks
    • Messy
    • Single minded stubborness
    • Noisy
    • Creature of habit and routine
  • Duck breeds I am working with
    • Cayugas
    • Hybrid Layers
    • Rouens
    • Runners (various)
    • Khaki Campbell
    • Swedish (may be?)
    • Muscovy
  • Best All Around Breeds (my opinion based on research)
    • Meat – Pekins or Grimaud Hybrid Pekin – Jumbo Pekin
    • Eggs – Hybrid 300 Layers (gold or white)
    • Self Propagating Dual Purpose – Muscovy
    • Dual Purpose – Buff (aka Buff Orpington)
  • Duck eggs and why they rock
    • Ducks are born with 1500 ovum vs. the 1000 of a chicken
    • Ducks are good layers for 3-4 seasons
    • 6x the Vitamin D, 2x the Vitamin A, of chickens
    • 2x the cholesterol in duck eggs vs chicken eggs (good cholesterol)
    • Higher fat and energy content (good fat)
    • Thick, viscus yolks (beautiful over easy/medium)
    • Better for baking if that is your thing
    • Less likely to break yolks, or accidentally crack one
  • The basics of raising and managing ducks
    • “Experts say space the same as chickens
    • 4 sf per duck in “coop” 10 sf per duck in “yard”
    • Ducks don’t “perch” except for muscovies (sometimes)
    • Fencing can be 3 feet high except for muscovies (sometimes)
    • I don’t use laying boxes because the ducks don’t seem to care
    • Generally most eggs are laid by 730ish am
    • Provide water, they shit it up FAST
    • A ducks personality tends to be the sum of its flock personality
  • Hatching young ducks
    • If you can get a mom to do it, let her do it
    • Incubation is the same as chickens, it just takes longer
    • Store eggs for up to 10 days, then start all of them together
    • Day 1-25 99.5 turn 7 times a day, Day 26-28 98.5 no turning
    • Day 1-33 99.5 turn 7 times a day, Day 33-35 98.5 no turning (muscovy)
  • Brooding young ducks
    • Expect to brood for 3-5 weeks depending on season
    • Provide heat on one end of brooder
    • Spend a lot of time with them if you want them “tame”
    • Feed them chick starter
    • They can go into a “tractor” in good weather as early as 2 weeks
    • Do not introduce them to the main flock until they are at least 60% grown
    • Develop a drain system for water
    • No “bathing water” until 2 weeks
    • They MUST be able to dunk their heads in water
    • Some will die, accept it
  • Final thoughts
    • If you incubate get a good incubator
    • Beware of “Tractor Supply Disease”
    • eFowl and Metzer are great places to order
    • Just do it, it isn’t hard

Resources for today’s show…

fuyuBob Wells Plant of the Week – Fuyu Persimmon – The Fuyu Persimmon tree is highly adaptable from zone 7 to zone 10.

They are medium size, flat shape, still crunchy when ripe, non-astringent.  This means “bletting” isn’t required.

Cool or hot climate. Hardy, attractive tree, practically pest free. It ripens in the fall and is Self-fruitful.

Find this plant and more at BobWellsNursery.com Bob Wells Nursery specializes in anything edible: Fruit trees, Berry Plants, Nut Trees, as well as the hard to find Specialty Trees.

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK (866-658-4465) and you might hear yourself on the air.

Also remember we have an expert council you can address your calls to. If you do this you should email me right after your call at jack at thesurvivalpodcast.com with expert council call in the subject line. In the body of your email tell me that you just called in a question for the council and what number you called in from. I will then give the call priority when I screen calls.

Join the MSB Today

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Want Every Episode of TSP Ever Produced?

Remember in addition to discounts to over 40 vendors who supply stuff you are likely buying anyway, tons of free ebooks and video content, MSB Members also get every edition of The Survival Podcast ever produced in convenient zip files in blocks of 24. More info on the MSB can be found here.

Episode-1451- Rapid Fire Q&A on Homesteading From Facebook

Check out the TSP Facebook Page

Check out the TSP Facebook Page

Late yesterday I did this post on facebook asking for any and all questions that are permaculture/homestead related.  The plan was to do a rapid fire q and a style show.

A this point I will say I will do my best, the post garnered over 150 comments in less than  12 hours time!  Some of the questions are easy, some are so complex as to require research and or a full show to cover them.  So I will pick and choose and do as many as I can do today.

If you haven’t liked the TSP Facebook Page this post is just one example of why you should.  I put out a lot of information and lots of just fun stuff for the TSP community on facebook.  Sometimes I leak information, and/or do a sale on facebook and twitter.  You just never know.

A lot of times when I put videos on YouTube I mention them on Facebook and Twitter long before they get posted to the TSP site.  Just like I did yesterday with my latest videos on the Red Pharaoh Chicken.

Due to the number of questions responded to I will not post them in the show notes, you can refer to the post on facebook if you want to say something directly to the person who asked the question or get a feel for how many questions were asked beyond my ability to respond to them.

Resources for today’s show…

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK (866-658-4465) and you might hear yourself on the air.

Also remember we have an expert council you can address your calls to. If you do this you should email me right after your call at jack at thesurvivalpodcast.com with expert council call in the subject line. In the body of your email tell me that you just called in a question for the council and what number you called in from. I will then give the call priority when I screen calls.

Join the MSB Today

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Want Every Episode of TSP Ever Produced?

Remember in addition to discounts to over 40 vendors who supply stuff you are likely buying anyway, tons of free ebooks and video content, MSB Members also get every edition of The Survival Podcast ever produced in convenient zip files in blocks of 24. More info on the MSB can be found here.

Episode-1450- TSP Homestead Lessons and Planning – Fall 2014

Three Bee Hives - One of Many Additions to the Homestead in 2014

Three Bee Hives – One of Many Additions to the Homestead in 2014

This is a great time of the year to look back at 2014 and begin fall/winter planning as well.  2014 was a big and very active year at the TSP ranch.

It also saw the launch of PermaEthos, AgriTrue, the TSP Wiki, SchoolStupidity.com and now we will soon be releasing  GenForward.com.

While I will talk a little bit about those things today I really want to focus mostly on the on the ground homestead improvements and lessons.  We now have a very large flock of chickens and a pretty good sized group of ducks.  The exciting part is our ducks are now laying eggs and I am absolutely in love with fresh duck eggs.

I also broke down and installed some “conventional garden beds” but I have already decided on a intensive polyculture model for them.  I have completed my sorghum trials and selected a variety to attempt to naturalize on the homestead and more.

Join Me Today As I Discuss…

  • The rise of the red pharaoh chicken
  • Ducks the gentle on the land birds still do some damage
  • The ducks also seem to lay enough and grow fast enough to be a good meat source
  • Geese these guys might all be legs up in an oven by years end, except for Buddy
  • Jute Mallow will self reseed in my climate, sowing is better though
  • The sorghum trials are in, Mennonite for the win, the contestants were
    • Black Amber – grows great, birds don’t love it though
    • Giant White African, huge yields but falls over
    • Tarahumara doesn’t self reseed as well as the others
    • Mennonite birds love it, compact, reseeds, coppices well for 2 crops
  • Plant propagation is like printing money
  • Don’t skimp on the “support trees” and get over the density concerns
  • Pop up green houses suck, time to build a real one
  • Wolf Berry is fricken tough as nails and easy to propagate
  • Dwarf Mulberry is awesome
  • My best trees and bushes to grow are
    • Apple
    • Peach
    • Plum
    • Mulberry
    • Jujube
    • Autumn Olive and Goumi
    • Elders in the right locations
  • Currants will grow in Texas in a “Goldy Locks spot”
  • If there are to be blueberries, they must be in a container
  • Some new things I am going to try
    • White clover as a ground cover
    • Sowing more vegetables in the food forest
    • Better irrigation systems
    • The beginnings of a full property “fedge” system
    • A controlled Red Pharaoh breeding program
    • Horse poop on contour (yes I am serious)
  • The biggest lesson, as soon as you find the “best way” you find a better way

Resources for today’s show…

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK (866-658-4465) and you might hear yourself on the air.

Also remember we have an expert council you can address your calls to. If you do this you should email me right after your call at jack at thesurvivalpodcast.com with expert council call in the subject line. In the body of your email tell me that you just called in a question for the council and what number you called in from. I will then give the call priority when I screen calls.

Join the MSB Today

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Want Every Episode of TSP Ever Produced?

Remember in addition to discounts to over 40 vendors who supply stuff you are likely buying anyway, tons of free ebooks and video content, MSB Members also get every edition of The Survival Podcast ever produced in convenient zip files in blocks of 24. More info on the MSB can be found here.

Episode-1427- How Much Land is “Enough”

You Don't Need a Remote Mountain Retreat to Have a Homestead.

You Don’t Need a Remote Mountain Retreat to Have a Homestead.

Please Note – there was a major math error in today’s show which will create a future “Jack Was Wrong Segment”.  I don’t know why but in this show I said 208 x 4 was 2,496.  This is clearly wrong the correct number was 832.

This should of made the tree counts 80 at 10 feet and 40 at 20 feet spacings.  This is what happens when you do math in your head on the fly I guess, given 208x4x3 is 2,496 I guess I was thinking in yards and talking in feet.  In a round about way I guess I put my foot in my mouth!

There is no hard rule as to how much land is “enough” and in fact the question itself is generally flawed. The person asking such a question is generally asking it as such, “How much land is enough to provide 100 percent of my needs”? The reason said question is flawed is simply that you are NOT going to provide 100% of your needs, on your own, from any piece of land.

There are a number of reasons that this is the case. The biggest reason though is simply man hours. A piece of land can only yield so much production and each square foot of land under cultivation requires human interaction.

Even a wild berry bush must be picked if one is to eat berries. Sure hens lay eggs and a small flock is a great addition to your homestead if you can do it, but they must be fed, watered, housed, culled, etc.

Today I want to take a different look at this question, by applying 10 more questions to it, they are,

  1. How much land do you have to work with?
  2. What climate type are you in and hence what can you easily grow?
  3. How much time do you have to work on the property weekly?
  4. Of the things that grow where you live, which do you most like to eat?
  5. What type of budget and time line do you have for improving your land?
  6. How long do you plan to own the property?
  7. Do you just want personal production or some sort of income?
  8. What laws and restrictions must be considered in your area?
  9. Will you actively live on the land in question?
  10. How will you store and deal with the surplus beyond immediate use?

From there we will take a look at how I might design a simple square 1 acre property.

Resources for today’s show…

Bob Wells Nursery Plant of the Week – Cold Hardy Avocados Varieties include: Joey, Lila, Poncho, Brazos Belle and Fantastic. Adaptable from zone 8 to zone 10

Medium sized avocados weighing approximately 6-10 ounces and are egg shaped. They have excellent rich flavor and are known to be heavy producers. Cold Hardy Avocado trees that are mature have withstood temperatures as low as 15-18 degrees. We recommend covering the tree the first winter if the temperature drops below freezing. Once the tree has been in the ground for a year and is well rooted it then will begin to withstand the colder temperatures.

The older the tree gets the more, cold hardy it becomes. For those of you who live anywhere above zone 8, we have the Joey Avocado which is a semi dwarf variety that you can grow in a container, and bring it inside during the winter.  See All Avacado Varieties Currently Available at Bob Wells Nursery.

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK (866-658-4465) and you might hear yourself on the air.

Also remember we have an expert council you can address your calls to. If you do this you should email me right after your call at jack at thesurvivalpodcast.com with expert council call in the subject line. In the body of your email tell me that you just called in a question for the council and what number you called in from. I will then give the call priority when I screen calls.

Join the MSB Today

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Remember in addition to discounts to over 40 vendors who supply stuff you are likely buying anyway, tons of free ebooks and video content, MSB Members also get every edition of The Survival Podcast ever produced in convenient zip files in blocks of 24. More info on the MSB can be found here.

 

Episode-1398- Mexican Joe on Prepper Networks and Homesteading

Joe “Mexican Joe” Sabedra is the creator of the North East Texas Preppers Network.  He is also a long time TSP listener, active homesteader and permaculturist and military veteran.

Joe considers himself addicted to skill development and skill teaching as well.  He is a life long learner who spends most of his time becoming a better prepper and a better teacher.

He joins us today for a fun episode where we discuss raising chickens on the cheap, radio communications and more.

Resources for today’s show…

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK (866-658-4465) and you might hear yourself on the air.

Also remember we have an expert council you can address your calls to. If you do this you should email me right after your call at jack at thesurvivalpodcast.com with expert council call in the subject line. In the body of your email tell me that you just called in a question for the council and what number you called in from. I will then give the call priority when I screen calls.

Join the MSB Today

Join the MSB Today

Want Every Episode of TSP Ever Produced?

Remember in addition to discounts to over 40 vendors who supply stuff you are likely buying anyway, tons of free ebooks and video content, MSB Members also get every edition of The Survival Podcast ever produced in convenient zip files in blocks of 24. More info on the MSB can be found here.

Episode-1396- All About Keeping Chickens

Our Rooster Upgrayedd More than Earns His Keep

Our Rooster Upgrayedd More than Earns His Keep

I think perhaps the hottest thing in the modern homesteading trend right now is keeping chickens for both meat and eggs.  It isn’t hard to understand why!  The chicken and mankind go back thousands of years as allies.  I figure the natural fit is mostly that chickens will eat almost anything people will eat and many things we won’t.

Hence you have a bird that lays eggs almost year round that in many places can make its living off your scraps and the surrounding land.  Once trained to a coop, which takes about a day on average it will put itself to bed at night and always come home unless something eats it.

If you want more of them you let a hen do all the work and hatch and raise the babies.  You take older birds and excess males and turn them into surplus meat.  At least that is the philosophy that chickens were raised under for most of history.  Today things are not as simple, in some cases they could be and in others modern reality conflicts with what would be easiest or cheapest.

Join Me Today to Discuss…

  • What is great about chickens
    • Easy to raise
    • Produces eggs
    • Provides some meat
    • Provides entertainment
    • Largely self sufficient
    • Produce fertilizer
  • What is not so great about chickens
    • Poop management
    • Can be destructive
    • Cost of upkeep
    • Housing requirements
    • Winter needs
    • Dealing with culling
  • Ways of raising chickens and my thoughts on them
    • Coop and run
    • Tractoring
    • Free range
    • Restricted free range
    • Paddock shift management
  • How many birds do you want (layers)
    • Most hens lay 5-6 eggs a week in peak
    • My hens tend to lay 3 eggs off peak your mileage may vary
    • Birds will eat about .25 pounds of feed a day, budget for it
    • I don’t consider roosters money sinks, they are guardians
  • Coop Size and Perch Size Requirements
    • 4 sq ft. per bird of floor space
    • 10-12 inches of roost per bird (at highest level)
    • For confined runs minimum 10 sq ft per bird
  • Thoughts on some layer breeds
    • Rhode Island Red
    • White Leghorn and Crosses
    • Production Reds (sex links)
    • Black Australorp
    • Buff Orpington
    • Your Own “Mutts”
  • Raising meat chickens (thoughts on breeds)
    • Cornish Cross
    • Heritage Whites
    • Red “Freedom” Rangers
    • Delaware Chicken
  • Protein Requirements
    • Layer Chick Starter (20% protein)
    • Layer Grower (16-18%) No Calcium Supplementation
    • Layer “Laying Phase”  (16-18%) With Calcium
    • Broiler Starter (20-22% protein)
    • Broiler Growing (18-20%) Be Careful
    • Broiler Finisher (15-18%) Not Required it’s about fat!
  • Feed Options
    • Commercial
    • Organic
    • Non GMO
    • Grocery Waste
    • Brewers/Distillers Grain
    • Fodder
    • Growing Feed
    • Kitchen Wastes
    • Pasture
    • Insects
  • Final Thoughts and Just do It

Resources for today’s show…

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK (866-658-4465) and you might hear yourself on the air.

Also remember we have an expert council you can address your calls to. If you do this you should email me right after your call at jack at thesurvivalpodcast.com with expert council call in the subject line. In the body of your email tell me that you just called in a question for the council and what number you called in from. I will then give the call priority when I screen calls.

Join the MSB Today

Join the MSB Today

Want Every Episode of TSP Ever Produced?

Remember in addition to discounts to over 40 vendors who supply stuff you are likely buying anyway, tons of free ebooks and video content, MSB Members also get every edition of The Survival Podcast ever produced in convenient zip files in blocks of 24. More info on the MSB can be found here.

Episode-1383- The Forest Market Garden Concept

Last week I did Episode 1379- The Profitable Small Acre Homestead and it seemed to be a pretty big hit.  Today’s show continues on that theme.  The reason I bring this up is 1379 has some business components that apply here and I will not be rehashing many of them, so to get the most from today’s show you may wish to listen to 1379 first if you have not already done so.

With 1379 fresh in my mind I was turned on to a book called, The Market Gardner by Jean-Martin Fortier.  I am currently reading it but one thing that struck me was the constant need for bed prep, soil amendments, seed and plant starting, heavy irrigation, etc.  And this is a book that promises to reduce work by “going small and focusing on intensive production and quality”.  Frankly it still sounds like a ton of work to me.

My view is a perennial style system while taking longer to yield is a lot less ongoing work and requires a lot less ongoing expense and inputs.  So today I am examining this concept in a live thought expirment.  Many of the concepts you have seen developed at TSP came via this type of thinking and planning and many other ideas never made it though the tunnel to the other side.

Hence, today’s show is not a statement of what will work, or even well planned.  It is just what I claim a thought experiment with a lot of work left to be done, but it is one I believe is highly valid and may in fact empower many homesteaders in the future to become profitable on small blocks of land ranging between 2-5 acres.  Perhaps even less.

Join Me Today to Discuss…

  • Why this approach
  • What is the downside
  • What are some of the biggest challenges
  • How might you reduce establishment costs
    • Establish a “beach head” with most planned varieties
    • Propagate and expand over time
    • Develop solid earthworks to reduce irrigation requirements
    • Use irrigation trays like IrriPan to establish, then expand with reuse
    • Thoughts on grafting including patented varieties
  • Thoughts on staggering harvest with fruit tree varieties
    • Apples (mid July to late Oct.)
    • Plums (mid May to early Oct.)
    • Cherry (early May to late June)
    • Apricots and Crosses (early May to early July, and Aug.)
    • Nectarines (late May to late Sept.)
    • Peaches (early May to late Sept.)
    • Pears (including Asian) (Late July to very early Nov.)
  • Thoughts on staggering harvest with berry varieties
    • Blueberries (May to July)
    • Blackberries (June to August plus late crop primacanes)
    • Raspberries (Mid June to July and Mid Aug. to Mid Oct.)
    • Currants and Gooseberry (mid June to mid July)
    • Strawberry (ever bearing and June bearing)
    • Grapes (August – September)
    • Wolfberry (Late June to first frost)
    • Elderberry (July to August)
    • Sea Berry (at least early Aug. to late Sept.)
  • Some cool value adds and how to incorporate them
    • Perennial herbs
    • Squash (winter and summer)
    • Dried berries
    • Mushrooms
    • Potentially reselling other local product in a cool way
    • Honey
  • Final Thoughts – this is viable but the design is still far away

Resources for today’s show…

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK (866-658-4465) and you might hear yourself on the air.

Also remember we have an expert council you can address your calls to. If you do this you should email me right after your call at jack at thesurvivalpodcast.com with expert council call in the subject line. In the body of your email tell me that you just called in a question for the council and what number you called in from. I will then give the call priority when I screen calls.

Our Expert Council is Made Up of…

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Episode-1379- The Profitable Small Acre Homestead

Homesteading is a dream for a lot of people, a some day idea.  Generally it is usually this way.  I need a job, so I need to be close to work, so we can’t afford a  huge place close enough, so ONE DAY I will have enough saved to make the move.

This can and does work, but one day has a way of becoming a moving target, a carrot before the horse that keeps the cart moving yet never is tasted for many.  So my view is for some at least, the homestead can at least in time become a significant income source.

Join Me Today As I Discuss…

  • Our basic plan and why it might not be right for you
    • Start with eggs, build a customer base
    • Sell other nice items, meal worms, candles, etc.
    • Begin selling plants, cuttings, fertilizers
    • Sell produce as it comes into production
    • Possibly at some point sell poultry
  • What I think you can learn from our plan and how you should build your design
    • Specialize in something that builds a customer base
    • Expand slowly over time
    • Develop DEEP relationships with your customers
    • Let them guide your development
  • What I would look for in a property
    • Close to a reasonable population center
    • Decent internet access
    • Good drive buy traffic
    • No restrictions (unincorporated if possible)
    • Deep soils with pond sites
    • Flat to relatively flat
    • As always it comes down to water, access, structure
  • Thoughts on different revenue elements
    • Paddock shift silvopasture poultry (eggs, meat)
    • Market gardening
      • raised beds of fixed length
      • heavy weed blocking
      • designed to the sun or shade by climate
      • Develop a CSA around it fast
    • Small nurseries
    • Small “orchards” for produce
    • Specialty craft products
    • Bees and bee products
    • Dairy
    • Other stock, cattle, sheep, goats, etc
    • Focus on value added products
  • Some final thoughts
    • It takes time, how much is based on how much you have
    • You can’t do everything so don’t even try to, do one thing then another
    • It isn’t for everyone, that is great!
    • It isn’t easy, but in reality it is simple
    • It is hard to do on your own, a multi family approach has a lot to offer
    • Making a living is better than working for a living

Resources for today’s show…

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK (866-658-4465) and you might hear yourself on the air.

Also remember we have an expert council you can address your calls to. If you do this you should email me right after your call at jack at thesurvivalpodcast.com with expert council call in the subject line. In the body of your email tell me that you just called in a question for the council and what number you called in from. I will then give the call priority when I screen calls.

Our Expert Council is Made Up of…

Join the MSB Today

Join the MSB Today

Want Every Episode of TSP Ever Produced?

Remember in addition to discounts to over 40 vendors who supply stuff you are likely buying anyway, tons of free ebooks and video content, MSB Members also get every edition of The Survival Podcast ever produced in convenient zip files in blocks of 24. More info on the MSB can be found here.