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Episode-2722- Round Table Topics for 8-31-20 — 62 Comments

  1. The intro comments caused me to reflect.  I don’t like talking about myself, but it’s the only way I know how to say this – My walk with Christ has developed over several decades. My journey has been FAR from perfect.  I fail on a daily basis. However, when I finally (fully) committed myself to Christ, there truly was a “peace that surpasses all understanding”. Philippians 4:7. One must experience this; it cannot simply be explained.  In my youth, this kind of talk would have sounded crazy to me. I imagine to some who read this, it will.  I had to fully submit myself to Jesus before my mind was allowed to be opened to His Word and to what it really means to have a Christian worldview.  Never assume that God isn’t speaking.  He has never stopped!  God’s Word is timeless and sharper than any two-edged sword.

    • While I don’t share your individual faith I share your faith in “God” and God speaks to us though our logic and reason and our observation of God’s creation. Which ever window you look though, which ever creed leads you there, the feeling is the same.

    • jesus is quoted as saying “do not resist him who is evil”.  in a civilized environment (such as rome or old america) it seems possible to live this way.  in a lawless environment (such as we are entering) this comes across to me as simply suicidal.  how do you see this?

  2. I know I’m slightly retarded. But I’m not seeing the link to the school you’re referring to. Sorry if I over looked it. Thanks for your work jack. I appreciate you.

  3. Here’s a scenario emphasizing how the plan of “let’s head into the area and defend against rioters!” is almost the definition of going into battle and THEN seeking to win.

    ————-

    You and your buddies see the old downtown area is getting flooded with rioters and protesters, so you kit up and head on down. While there, a couple thugs throw bricks at you from a rooftop, badly injuring one of you and knocking another of you out cold. You and your remaining buddies each fire a few careful shots at them, killing one and driving the other away.

    Justice done, right? Well, the guy who fled runs to the next block and tells the first bunch of protesters (ones that are largely just chanting and marching) they see about the guys who gunned down his friend in cold blood. A few of them are armed, and filled with the same kind of righteous anger and desire to protect that you and your buddies also have, rush in your direction to stop the mass shooting and save lives. You and your buddies see three people coming from around the block shooting at you, and you reflexively return fire. After it’s all over, a couple of the other guys are dead and one of your friends is dying, and you’ve been shot and need to go to the hospital.

    1) Best case: Your dying friend is saved and after an expensive hospital stay & expensive court battle, you and and your remaining friends are acquitted of murder. But you do get a nation-wide reputation with a large segment of the population that would even make George Zimmerman go “damn, that’s rough!”. Also, you have to live knowing you killed two otherwise decent people due to a misunderstanding.

    2) Medium case: All of the above applies, but after your acquittal another series of riots spring up in several major cities. You also have to fight the civil case that follows months later, and win or lose your finances are devastated.

    3) Worst case: All of the above applies, but your friend dies of his wounds and you have a permanent crippling injury. You get convicted on some charges and have accept a plea deal to avoid a life sentence. You don’t become a free man or woman again for about a decade.

    ————-

    Going into such a situation has so many more potential bad outcomes than good for yourself that it just doesn’t make good sense. The desire to just “do something” has to be tempered with more than just idealism. You have to have a clear vision of what the end result will be and a decent plan to get there. Otherwise, you’re little more than the armed equivalent of the “Underpants Gnomes” from South Park…

  4. It’s very easy to show Joe Biden leading in the polls when you survey 35-40% Republicans. The headlines are the same, but if the polling service discloses party affiliation it’s easy to see the skew. I’ve read a few of these myself, but how many Americans would take the headline at face value? Trump is not wrong when he claims 96% approval within the Republican Party, or 51% overall approval.     As Spirko says, “Well, it depends.”

  5. Lately I’ve been trying to think of what’s coming less in terms as the next Great Depression, and more as an event that is simply extreme & rapid change (maybe “The Great Shift”? “The Great Transformation”?). There’s almost certain to be elements very similar to the Great Depression… credit & debt collapse, mass unemployment, and a big downward move in class migration all seem already baked into the cake. But at the same time I think it will coincide with many societal changes and technological leaps, and with that will possibly be many more opportunities to adapt and even thrive than most people had 90 years ago. Of course, that doesn’t mean the majority will grab or even see said opportunities… only that the opportunities will exist.

    I also suspect this will be compressed into less than a decade rather than 16 years. But I’m less certain about that, especially if there’s an massive cold/proxy war with China.

    • “Lately I’ve been trying to think of what’s coming less in terms as the next Great Depression, and more as an event that is simply extreme & rapid change (maybe “The Great Shift”? “The Great Transformation”?). ”

      If I were 24 and single again in a bar and this comment was a woman, I would be buying her breakfast tomorrow.

  6. When you say get out of the cities, are you including the suburbs and surrounding areas of major cities as well, or just the downtown areas? What are you specifically meaning? 
    Are there any cities you think are safer than others? For example, is Dallas or San Antonio safer than say Las Angeles or San Francisco? Or, do you think all cities are at risk, regardless of the state the city is in?

    • As always it depends. I can’t tell you what is going on in every city in the end you must make the call yourself.

      My view though is if your suburb is only there due to the presence of a true flash point city, get the fuck out now.

      Lets look at say LA, everything around LA is there because of LA. LA Suburb, GTFO NOW! It is not just safety it is quality of life, value of property and what the government IS GOING TO DO IN THE REBUILDING.

      There is a plan that torching these cities is part of. The plan is to end the concept of Urban Suburbs and end all autonomy of them as far out from the city center as they can. Obama set this in motion, Trump to his credit put the breaks on it hard. The riots are part of the 2.0 plan to do it anyway.

      In the new burbs there will be NO single family homes, all developed areas will be subsidized government housing in the name of environmentalism. The wallets of the burbs will be looted to the extreme to fund the city they surround. Property values are going to go though the floor while taxes go up.

      Only you can know if this is the fate to befall your city but I can say some that are unlikely to burn in the conventional sense are ripe to be part of this anyway. Phoenix springs to mind here. So does Vegas.

      Just google, ending single family zoning, and start reading.

      • Instead of running your mouth with catch phrases like a moron take up my challenge. Explain a walk though were “confrontation” works out to the advantage of those doing it. Nick did it, he came up with bad worse and awful.

        So you do it, you give me a scenario where confrontation leads to victory and what victory looks like. Go ahead, I will wait.

        • “give me a scenario”

          the rioters are a relative handful of noise makers, with almost all the media amplifying the noise.  what victory looks like is 1) the citizens recognizing this and organizing to respond, 2) voting in or creating new leadership backing existing law and civic authority to deal with organized rioting and looting and crime, and if necessary to create new/extended law and civic authority to do the same, and 3) enforcing it with the full expressed backing of the citizens (and perhaps their direct participation).  this is how civilizations act, have always acted, and will always act.

          1 is well in progress.  2 is already happening.  3 is ready.

        • 2, voting = you are fucking delusional. LA, Portland, Seattle, Chicago are going to vote in what? Unknown republicans this November? Many of their city council districts run UNOPPOSED you dim bulb, because no republican thinks it is worth filling out a form for. Cities that have been Democrat for 50-70 years in some cases for 100 years will do what, flip republican?

          I really do not know where you get your dope but I sure wish you share that shit. Tommy Chong doesn’t have dope as good as your dope.

          These cities are democrat run shit holes today and they will still be democrat run shit holes tomorrow. You don’t even ID the real problem anyway.

          These cities are going to be burnt, rebuilt and set up to take all autonomy from the surrounding suburbs.

          As to 2 is already in progress, what fuckin dope do you put on top of your dope?

          Sure the orange man is likely to win, (which is the democrats plan playing the long game) it won’t change who runs these flash point cities.

        • The ‘voting’ part made me LOL =p

          Yes, people can retake RESPONSIBILITY for their own welfare and effect change via organized action.

          That has NOTHING to do with ‘government’ & ‘voting’.

          I read a LOT of history. I have yet to run into ANY change, in any civilization, where ‘The Citizens VOTED, and behold, CHANGE’.

          Yes I understand that the political parties CLAIM such things…but it ain’t ever happened. Ever.

        • “Yes, people can retake RESPONSIBILITY for their own welfare and effect change via organized action.  That has NOTHING to do with ‘government’ & ‘voting’”

          (nod)  so your organized action will have no voting as to what that action should be?  if some great leader arises who displaces voting perhaps this might work, but usually voting is disparaged because one thinks everyone will just up and agree (with them) making voting irrelevant – but that never happens.

          yes, by voting, however done – by ballots, by show-of-hands, by popular acclaim on the steps of the forum, by whatever local warlord accumulates the most followers – but by voting, yes.

  7. “get out of the cities”

    cities are where all material power is concentrated.  if the cities are taken and reformed into socialist entities, how will the countryside stand?

        • “I am not wet I am just covered in excess water”

          yes, for libertarians/anarchists it’s all “me” and “you” and thus they are blind to any distinction between collectivist/citizen – it’s all “not me”.  but successful civilizations do distinguish.

          cities are where all material power is concentrated.  if the cities are abandoned by citizens and are taken and reformed into socialist entities, how will the remaining countryside stand?

        • Every time you attempt to say anything about libertarianism you look like a total fuckin moron so please keep going.

    • @gman-

      I agree, the cities are where most material power is currently concentrated. But it doesn’t HAVE to be. When the people with material wealth choose to go where their money is treated better (and many are moving already), whatever new place(s) they go eventually will become the new hubs of financial activity. This won’t happen overnight, but I do expect within a decade we’ll see some surprising places emerge as new financial and tech hubs.

      That said, I DO expect some big cities that are better managed and least taxed will weather the storm better and maybe even thrive. In some of those cities it may make sense to stay, depending on your career, lifestyle, and attachments. While Jack’s recent mantra is “get out of the cities”, I do remember him qualifying that statement with a similar clarification. But regardless, if whatever city you’re in now is already highly taxed and dealing with problems close to the level of Portland, Chicago, and New York, it’s not likely to get any better when things deteriorate further in the next 5 years. Sometimes you gotta pick your battles and know which battles are not worth fighting.

      • His problem Nick is he is a sith, he deals in absolutes. I say “get out of the FLASHPOINT cities” he hears get out of ALL the cities.

        Then he says if we do they will all become socialist. Well they are ALREADY all socialist, they have all been run by democrats for more than 50 years. What does he think is being resisted by staying? Does he expect that the orangeman is gonna flip NYC, LA, Chicago, Seattle and Portland red in 2020?

        Your points as always though Nick are thought out and valid. The cities are not truly the seats of power, the rest of the nation FEEDS THEM, there is no major city in this nation that could feed itself for more than a week let alone a month. The number one export of our major cities is garbage.

        • “the rest of the nation FEEDS THEM”

          true, but that’s not a one-way street.  farmers need financing, fuel, and transport to produce food, and these all originate in the cities.

          and it’s worse than that.  most rural areas are effectively banana republics, paying for themselves by producing one or two products that pay for everything else.  most rural areas do not produce their own fertilizer or shoes or firearms or medicines or tires or tools or combines or, well, anything.  all of that is produced in cities and imported to rural areas.

      • “cities are where most material power is currently concentrated. But it doesn’t HAVE to be”

        well, wealth is not just gold/silver/money, it’s community and productive capacity.  this requires aggregation of families and population and money and industry and education and transportation and everything else – and by the time all this is aggregated it’s another city.  a city is not just a temporary work camp of ronin workers living in barracks and globe-trotting money interests who all take flight at the first sign of discomfort, it’s a place where people set up lives and families and they won’t quit it willingly.  why duplicate this?  if  you’re going to set up a city somewhere else, why not work to keep the city you have?  because if you can’t keep the city you have you won’t be able to keep any other city elsewhere and you definitely won’t be able to keep the countryside around it.

        “I DO expect some big cities that are better managed and least taxed will weather the storm better and maybe even thrive. In some of those cities it may make sense to stay”

        I agree.  but I would suggest that the cities that are better managed and least taxed are so primarily because they are populated in the first place by people who are not going to cave and leave.  the way of the libertarian/anarchist is to search for a pre-existing city and move in to use it for as long as it lasts – the way of the citizen is to build the city and stay and keep it.

        “Sometimes you gotta pick your battles and know which battles are not worth fighting”

        sure.  but as sun tzu says, “on death ground, fight.”

        • First off, productive capacity and community are not as permanent as you let on. China lured away a huge chunk of US production in just two decades, and in many such areas the decline in community followed (big cities and smaller towns alike). This will happen again, only within the country and between states and cities.

          Second, it doesn’t take a city full of completely unattached workers to see this flight… you act as if the only reason people move is because of money (there’s things like moving closer to one’s loved ones, starting a new family, career growth opportunities, wanting to live closer to nature, etc.). We moved away from Denver and to Mongolia in large part for examples #1,3, & 4 above. Sometimes the people you perceive as running away from something are actually chasing an opportunity for a better life.

          Third, you present this as if every battle and war can be won (in terms of us ‘keeping the cities’), and at the same time you claim that if we DO leave some of these big cities we will automatically lose whatever place we relocate to. Not only are both absolutes and incorrect, but they also contradict each other.

          Fourth, the vast majority are not “on the death ground”. At least not YET. There’s plenty of room for us to retreat or find a better place (however you want to frame it), and for some that move would vastly improve our lives. Sure it might be a lot more painful for some more than others, but for the vast majority it’s all simply a matter of how much you’re willing to pay to accomplish a given goal. If you want to put it in military terms, the general who never retreats and never changes his/her strategy is a shitty general. Not using the opportunity to give ground in order to accomplish larger objectives/priorities is foolhardy.

          Lastly, this is purely my opinion but I think the battle for the spirit of SOME of these cities is already lost. For some maybe it can be rekindled at some later point, but likely not until the systemic breakdown has run its course. We have to be cognizant of the things we CAN and CANNOT control, and when larger forces we can’t control are running rampant, getting out of the way is often the best course of action.

        • “sure. but as sun tzu says, “on death ground, fight.”

          Never by choice! This is given so out of the context it was written in. This is the strategy of being caught in the kill box of the ambush. Charge into the enemy because it is your only chance and you are still probably going to die. Yes in that situation you fight with all you have it is your only hope.

          But you don’t willing walk into it. If you had been an LT in the Army you would have been fragged.

        • “if you’re going to set up a city somewhere else, why not work to keep the city you have?”

          YOU DON’T HAVE THESE CITIES, you have not had them ever, they have been socialist democrat run cities for as long as you have been alive. You sound like the guy who paid 300 dollars a share for Yahoo stock in 1999 still holding it.

        • “you act as if the only reason people move is because of money”

          well what you said was “When the people with material wealth choose to go where their money is treated better” so I responded to that.

          “things like moving closer to one’s loved ones, starting a new family, career growth opportunities, wanting to live closer to nature”

          sure, and this always has been going on, both in and out of cities.  but now the much larger trend is outbound, because of money and security issues.  unfortunately in so doing they’re leaving behind the source of money and security, which is aggregated human effort and mutual support.  in avoiding the present problems rather than dealing with them they will indeed find residual sunset financial stability and security in some hidey-hole, but it won’t last long.

          ” you present this as if every battle and war can be won”

          not every battle can be won.  but if you don’t fight at all you’ll lose the war.  and that is what our enemies are hoping – to win without serious fighting.  “you left.  it’s ours now.”

          “the vast majority are not “on the death ground”. At least not YET. There’s plenty of room for us to retreat or find a better place ”

          actually, we are.  citizens are being induced to retreat from exactly precisely what makes their nation function – the ones pushing this have thousands of years of experience and know exactly what they’re doing – into isolated private idahos where they can be dealt with in detail at leisure.

          “the battle for the spirit of SOME of these cities is already lost”

          a city’s spirit is determined by its denizens.  if the citizens leave, the ticks win.  if the citizens stay and man up and take charge, they can defeat the ticks.

          (… mongolia?)

        • “Never by choice!”

          no, of course not.  but we don’t.  some kill boxes are large and long-term.

          now of course I say that as a citizen with a home and a nation.  for a libertarian/anarchist however this makes no sense whatsoever.  they’re like birds – alight when it’s advantageous, take flight when anything untoward approaches because there’s always someplace else to go.  but soon you’ll run out of places to land.

        • “YOU DON’T HAVE THESE CITIES”

          the cities belong to whoever controls them …

          “they have been socialist democrat run cities for as long as you have been alive”

          … and the socialism there having matured and shown its full face, they’re ripe for a turnover.

          “You sound like the guy who paid 300 dollars a share for Yahoo stock in 1999 still holding it”

          stock in the united states of america.  and still holding, yes.

        • @gman-

          Uh, you DO know that you were the first to mention material power, right? (-> “cities are where material power is concentrated.  if they are socialized, there will be nowhere to go”). But I guess deflection is easier than addressing my argument on the other reasons I gave why people move ?

          “(… mongolia?)”

          Yes, Mongolia (MNG is one abbreviation for it). We moved here a few years ago, not running from something but heading towards something. And we are happier than we were in Denver, even though we make much less money. Just think a bit on that and how it compares to absolutist statements equating “leaving the big cities = giving up”. If you see it only in that way, you are missing out on so much of the bigger picture.

  8. Two things…

    1. Scott Adams predicts 2021 being a tremendous year. He’s damn good at predictions. Jack is good at predicting things too. Two experts at prediction…I look forward to the seeing who predicts more accurately.
    2. I’m having a child in April 2021. He or she will never step foot in a government school. We’ve got bigger plans for my child than to flounder in a broken system.

    • I’ve had the same thought, and I think Scott Adams is a great source of ideas and new ways to look at the world. But at the same time, he’s much more focused on aspects of persuasion, testing ideas, and developing systems & ways of thinking that encourage success than he is on prediction. His prediction of 2021 being a tremendous year could be more about trying to encourage positivity about the future (so as to persuade individuals to be more receptive to the future opportunities that can improve their lives) than it is about simply predicting an outcome. Or it might be that it’ll be a sucky year overall but with a handful of really good opportunities (gold, cryptocurrency, rural/urban fringe real estate) for those willing & able to seize them.

      While it’s not my base case, I can see how 2021 might turn out to be a tremendous year. But it’d be mostly just for those people and big companies closest to the QE/stimulus spigot, with the average person just sorta squeaking by via stimulus and boosted unemployment payments. Historically speaking, the first 2 or so years of ramped-up money printing tends to give the appearance of economic prosperity. It’s the years immediately following where currency crises take hold and things get bad all around.

      • Let’s just say I hope he is right and I am wrong but what it will take is exactly what you just described, “positivity about the future” if there can be enough enthusiasm and if CoVid ends (I think it will) may be dooms day can be deferred again. I have looked for a way for this to happen but I just can’t see it. And I WANT to see it.

        • Same; I don’t think the day of reckoning is likely to be held off much longer. Possibly dragged out painfully over a longer span of time, but not delayed. To be held off almost everything would have to go right… Covid-19 no longer a thing, smooth & uncontested election, employment #’s surge dramatically, rioting subsides, sudden rising optimism about the future… to make that a probable outcome.

          But it doesn’t mean we can’t be positive about our own future, which I suspect is Scott Adams’ aim in making that casual prediction (positive mindsets over time tend to lead to positive outcomes). But hey, if he starts pushing that prediction with the same the repetition & conviction that he gave his 2016 Trump win prediction, then I’ll at least give that possibility more consideration. I don’t think he’s always (or even mostly) right, but so far his opinions and thoughts have always at least been worth a listen.

  9. Your story about your grandson’s ‘school day’ makes me so happy.

    THAT is the way a HUMAN child’s day needs to be.

    Eat when you’re hungry, sleep when you’re tired, learn what interests you. ie. Freedom.

     

    On your question as to what the schools are doing with your kids all day…I’ve been thinking lately that all of government can be summed up as:

    PAY ATTENTION TO ME! I’M (VERY) IMPORTANT! (said while stomping your foot and tossing your head…think VERY petulant child)

    Except this child has a gun, and ain’t afraid to use it to get the ‘attention’ it deserves. So how does this tie in to your question? The MORE IMPORTANT something is, the more resources you invest in it. Investment of time & money = how ‘important’ something is.

    If you’re rational, you invest ‘enough’ into important things. But that’s not the way a CANCER works, for a cancer, it’s MOHR RESOURCES FOREVER. ie. If 8 hours a day of indoctrination is good, ten is better. If ten is better, fourteen would be EVEN BETTER…the only limit is the Parents hitting the wall and pushing back. Which apparently is 2-3 hours of home-indoctrination per day.

  10. Vertical Farm v3.0

    I like the clay balls concept. The corrugated plastic works, but it’s an inflexible system (you can’t change plant spacing based on type, or decide to swap to different net pot sizes without a new piece). It also makes me wonder if you could just do direct planting into the balls, particularly for things you’re trying to sprout. Or maybe even some root crops! =)

    In the video it looks like you went to 1″(?) pipe for the overflow return. Is that due to the larger pump (more water volume)?

    Much better way (cheaper/more flexible) way to connect the two reservoirs.

    I also like moving the starts to the top tray. Generally most of it’s empty (can only eat so many microgreens) and I have them somewhere else taking up space, but there’s MORE than enough space to do them in the top tray.

    My shallow tray also cracked at the bulkhead connector (after 7 days of operation, left review on Amazon). I glued a piece of 1/4″ plywood on the bottom and reinforced the top with some waterproofing tape (roofing supply). If anyone is building one of these from scratch, I’d suggest doing that at the beginning. I like the tray, but it’s too big IMO. If anyone knows about a half size one, that would be interesting. =)

    Maybe do clay balls in shallow tray to reduce algae? Just dig out a hole when you put in sprouting trays or starts?

     

    Unrelated, doing ten tomato plants with strings/clips and an adjustable (up/down) rack or lights (4’x6) in the garage. Want to see if I can get tomatoes all winter (also going to try cucumbers). Due to space constraints, put them in Kratky bins, but I may add a bubbler. We’ll see how it goes.

     

    • Sprouting directly in clay balls:

      Was putting 2-3 seeds in plugs to ensure sprout, but with things like lettuce & tomatoes getting 100% germination. Rather than kill the ‘extra’ plants, I pull them out and stick them in a 2″ net pot with clay balls. Works great in v.1 vertical farm, but I have my water level touching the bottom of the net pots.

      In v.3 seems like you could just stick them right in the tray.

    • “In the video it looks like you went to 1?(?) pipe for the overflow return. Is that due to the larger pump (more water volume)?”

      So you now have 3 seperate returns combining into one return.  All the returns are still 1/2 inch bulkheads but they convert to 1 inch due to now having far more to deal with.  I have said many times that no one ever said, gee I wish my return lines were smaller.

      “It also makes me wonder if you could just do direct planting into the balls, particularly for things you’re trying to sprout. Or maybe even some root crops! =)”

      Oh you can but with high turn leaf crops this doesn’t make the best use of space.  By starting in the top tray you keep the growing area for prime time growing and can have more large plants.

      “Maybe do clay balls in shallow tray to reduce algae? Just dig out a hole when you put in sprouting trays or starts?”

      As long as you keep the balls deep enough to stay dry at the top you get zero algae.  As to the top tray if you ball it you loose a lot of flexibility.  The ability to toss 6 packs in if you also garden as a plant nursery is amazing.  I am going to keep a bottle of peroxide spray with it and teach the wife to spray it daily when empty.  I am also going to 15 on, 120 off on the cycles that should help a lot with less algae.  No way you dry out in that time allotment and it further conserves electricity.

       

       

  11. Are you suggesting that America as we know it only has 4 years left if Donald Trump wins and Republicans take massive gains across the board?

  12. Jack, the reason you get 6 1/2 hours work of schoolwork done in under 2 hours of home school is because teachers spend so much time dealing with problem students. If you wanted to fix public education, you have to get rid of the students who don’t want to learn. School as we know it is a crime against children, not only does it rob them of so much of their childhood, it also robs them of creativity and curiosity, and turns them into cynics.   Another reason schooling is so any efficient is because we spoon feed education to our children, instead of teaching them how to learn for themselves, the best taught are self taught.

    • “Jack, the reason you get 6 1/2 hours work of schoolwork done in under 2 hours of home school is because teachers spend so much time dealing with problem students.”

      Sorry BULLSHIT, total complete bullshit.  When I was in school in the 80s it was the same shit and no my teachers didn’t spend all day with “problem students”.

      That is not a factual answer because there are plenty of schools that do not have this problem and the time/work ratios don’t change and have not in my life time.  Your answer earned you an F on this assignment.

  13. Jack, your aspergers is kicking in.  I am right, I was there.  It is a huge problem.  I subbed for two years while getting my certification (what a joke) in every kind of class you can imagine.  Student behavior was terrible everywhere, with one exception.  The school where all the very rich kids went.    I wasnt going to waste my life,so I went to private schools and quickly became principal.  We joked that we got more done by first recess (2 hours) than the school across the street did all day. Which is pretty much what you are observing.  There are other reasons: teachers themselves are very poorly educated,  they have low expectations,  the cheif goal for public schools being equity, not excellence.  Things have changed a lot since you were there.  The good teachers are quitting in droves because behavior is so bad.  So what do you think is the problem?

    • Do you realize how delusional this sounds?

      “I am right, I was there.”

      Where? In every classroom in America? In my class rooms when the same work ratios existed in 1985? Sorry bullshit same thing with my niece she went to fairy land for high school. No problems same shit 2-3 hours of work a night after 7-8 hours in school every day.

      Your claim is not backed by facts or anything approaching reality. You can’t show me any place this work ratio does not hold true in the country but I can show you schools were teachers don’t spend the entire day dealing with “problem kids”. There were NO such problems in my school in the 80s, zero. If you caused shit you were toast and fast, same exact ratio, spend 7 hours a day in school go home with 2-3 hours of work. Where exactly do you get your bullshit from?

      The answer here is simple. Schools are a bureaucracy. It does not take 8 hours a day to provide K-12 ed, not even close. So it is all bullshit filler. Then teachers being bureaucrats do what all bureaucrats do, pass on the work to others when they can, in this case parents. This is why kids like me read the text book in the first week, slept though all their classes and got As.

    • Strawman bullshit. People understand what is being said, they are saying only 6% of CoVid deaths were due to CoVid alone, CDC does not like this as it is their own fact shoved into their fuckin faces so they change the arguement to “only 6% of CoVid deaths are due to CoVid” and argue the point no one is making.

      At this point both the CDC and WHO should be totally 100% completely ignored.

      • But it wasn’t. If you look at the charts and how it elaborates the other commodities you can clearly see it’s not “only those who were already dying”. If you don’t get your information form them, who do you get it from? I am not saying to just take the information and run, but clearly you shouldn’t just dismiss them like you dismiss everyone else who brings a point counter to yours.

        • NO ONE SAID THEY WERE ALL ALREADY DYING, please burn your strawman yourself this time, I don’t have the fuckin time to deal with this stupid shit today.

          Sure a shit load were already dying, many were not, but the 47% of all deaths in elder care had a median life expectancy of 4 months, you can’t change that.

          Next it isn’t about “already dying” it is about knowing who needs to be protected, protect them, accept risk, go on with life and this thing will hit herd immunity fast, just like it did in Sweden. Now that is all I have, I am not going to further argue a point no intelligent person is making.

  14. I love your idea of just picking a day and opening ALL business’s up.  I was just thinking about this myself the past few days and how it would totally tie-up the court systems and/or entities tasked with enforcement.  I’m not a business owner or even employee for that matter, but I would definitely set that day aside to visit and spend money in all the “newly opened” business’s.

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