Episode-50- How to Survive – An Overview of Modern Survivalist Philosophy

Last night I was asked a simple question, “well if you run the survival podcast, then tell me, how do you survive”.  This inspired todays show on Modern Survivalist Philosophy.

Tune in today to hear…

  • How the creation of the Federal Reserve has led to volentary enslavement of the American People
  • Why debt freedom creates individual freedom
  • Why debt was the only way to take over the America of the 1800s and how it took generations for it to occur
  • The freedom of producing your own food
  • How Tax is theft and how a bloodless revolution could reclaim America
  • The “investment value” of stored food
  • The logical way to use and view alternative energy
  • The true wealth of land ownership
  • Using “the system” in modern survivalism with down to earth things like insurance and investing
  • The lesson of the immigrants that built our rail roads and mined our coal – use the system to get out of it
  • Why our personal survival philosophy is more important to you then anyone elses
  • The fundmental truths of survivalism, liberty and knowledge

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show.

4 Responses to Episode-50- How to Survive – An Overview of Modern Survivalist Philosophy

  1. I’ve got a question about the buying of food today at a cheaper price than it will cost six months from now. I understand where you’re coming from, but I have a problem. See, I’ve got an old, non-operating refrigerator in my basement. It was there when I “bought” the house. It perfectly find, though, for storing food, which I’ve begun to do.

    Here’s the problem. I’m marking-down the expiration dates on everything, so that in the future I can consume it before it spoils. Now, when I consume it, I have to replace it… so I’m going to end-up paying tomorrow’s price to eat it, essentially. It’s really the cost of storing the food, rather than the cost of consuming it.

    I’m not trying to point-out an error… it’s sort of a paradox, I guess. Ultimately, it doesn’t matter to me because I’m not maintaining this food supply for economic reasons. I’m maintaining it in case the food stops showing-up! And, if that happens, that food’s gonna be priceless, won’t it?

    (I really, really hope that doesn’t happen, though…)

  2. Jack,

    I think this is one of you best podcast yet! I downloaded it at work this afternoon and listened to it as I slaved away in front of my computer.
    At one point during your ‘cast you said something about like, ‘people should be able to do things like our forefathers’. ‘Have many skills to have a better chance to survive the future’. It reminded me of a quote from a science fiction novella, “Time Enough for Love” written by Robert Anson Heinlein. He wrote,
    “A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.”
    He wrote and said many other things about freedom and liberty. One of the best collections I found was on the Wikiquote.com website.
    I find you a breath of fresh air within the “Suvivalist” community. I agree that too many of the “tin hats” are give us a bad name. You talk straight and don’t take no bull.
    You had so many other great points in this ‘cast I could type for an hours about it, but I’m going to end it here and just say a final…Well Done.

    ps…the ‘tin hats’ aren’t really ‘tin’. They are aluminum. Everyone knows ‘tin’ conducts magnetic waves while aluminum does not! -grin-

  3. Psyllium Eater

    Hi, Jack. I am in my early twenties and I am very concerned about my survival. Because of this concern I have, I save up about 80 per cent of my income. Many of my friends spend a lot of time spending money on sports cars, going to nightclubs, and so forth. I prefer to be thrifty. The way to be thrifty is to not be so willing act according to your emotions.

    Because I’m so different to everyone, I feel isolated and lonely. I have thought about getting a girlfriend and having kids to fix this problem, but because I have been thrifty for my whole life, I immediately start to worry that if I get married, have kids, etc then the children will dwindle my resources and threaten my survival.

    How do I reconcile my desire for children and my desire for personal survival?

  4. @Psyllium Eater,

    I’m not Jack and don’t want to speak for him; all I’m doing it offering some suggestions (as rhetorical questions to you):

    1. You’re saving money; this is a good thing, though what are you doing with it to both prepare (for your future (whether for survivalism or family (don’t discount the value of having a family and the joy and strength that can bring you)))?
    2. Do you need to save that much of your income? Could you say drop the amount to 50 or 60% and with the extra money, be able to socialize and gain like minded friends and a girlfriend?
    3. I’m not saying you’re too young; but you don’t have to have a girlfriend and kids asap. Could you not work towards that and say in a couple of years, be prepared to have kids with someone you’ve spent years getting to know, are able to be genuine with and honestly know that she sees the world in a similar way that you do?

    Just my thoughts and suggestions.