Episode-697- Listener Feedback for 7-5-11

Today we have an awesome listener feedback show.  We discuss the dealing with debt, normalcy bias, saving seeds and more.  We also have an amazing story from a veteran who went through hard times and how prepping and gardening turned his life around.

Join me today as we discuss…

  • Saving money at the “Salvage Grocery Store”
  • Sources for seeds and plants in cold climates
  • Deprogramming from normalcy bias
  • A listeners EDC tip for key chain items
  • How many seasons of seed should be in your seed storage
  • Some Senior Citizens still paying on student loans
  • Dealing with multiple debts
  • Reducing the risk of a low equity home ownership
  • Mushrooms in the compost pile and the garden
  • States go after an internet sales tax
  • A shortage of rare earth phosphors will lead to increased lighting costs
  • Getting money out of a 401K if your employer says you can’t
  • An amazing story of personal survival, prepping and gardening by a vet

Additional Resources for Today’s Show

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK and you might hear yourself on the air.

 

16 Responses to Episode-697- Listener Feedback for 7-5-11

  1. The question regarding planting on a drain field I found interesting. I have three apple trees planted near my drain field. My drain field is a mound and the trees are planted along the side to help screen it. They are at the bottom of the mound with the closest one to the field being about 25′ away. Is this safe?

  2. love your broadcast. Been preping for back as far as Mel Tappins day in the 70s. Have done most all the things you folks are preaching and still making chnanges as needed. Keep up the good work. Things I believe will hit the fan a lot sooner then most think. dj

  3. Many years back, with a house full of kids, and carpet in need of replacing, I looked at ceramic tile. To my surprise, I found I could replace the tile for less than having the carpet redone by doing it myself and buying the tile from a surplus store. Our house is built on a concrete slab. Never having done such before, no construction experience, I replaced with tile in the living room, kitchen/dining area, hallway with some of the kids help. No regrets. Better for those with allergies, and we’d have needed to replace the carpet several times since then.
    The last story is very impressive, great example, thanks for sharing.

  4. Thanks for the kind words Jack, It felt good hearing my story on the air, hopefully sharing it will help others along their path to self sufficiency or self reliance or help other veterans that may be going through similar things as what I had gone through.
    You had mentioned on your previous episode (696) that you would like to have people on the air to discuss what they are doing in regards to healing from a garden, what they are doing and what is or isn’t working for them. I would be more than willing to do this and share more of my story; my time in the sandbox, my backyard eden that I am creating, the trials and tribulations of starting and trying to run a business and anything else that the community would be interested in hearing as it pertains to self sufficiency/self reliance.

    • Dan, I’m a little behind on listening to TSP episodes, and just heard your call in when I listened to Episode 697 this week.
      Your story is truly inspirational. Like Jack said, thanks for your service to our country, and thank you for your service to you and yours.
      Jack, please do get Dan on the air–I’d love to hear more of his story!!

  5. Dan’s story was inspiring to me. Being a veteran myself I know the courage this man has. To adjust in the civilian world after what he went through and the ability to adapt and overcome in his situation is resialiancy we all need to learn to have. Thanks for the show Jack. I am a regular listener. Keep up the good work.

  6. Some information on the student loan situation. The reason that Great Plains could not consolidate his student loans is two fold. The first is that student loans are person specific. It does not matter if you are married, siblings, or surgically attached, you cannot consolidate student loans between two people.
    The other reason is that FFELP loans have been eliminated. There cannot be any new FFELP loans. So Great Plains cannot consolidate those loans. However if he wanted to he could to the the Direct Loan program and get them consolidated.

  7. Shannon Moore

    Jack,
    You made me stop working with that last one. Wow.

  8. You call student loan Serfdom. Look at child support because the government has incentivized single moms giving them free money, low-income housing, and other stuff.

    Supporting a family on one income is hard and still hard with two incomes. The dad that has to pay for child support for kids he is no allowed to see because his ex is afraid for the children because he served in Iraq and Afghanistan is just wrong.

    Child support is Serfdom and slavery and no accountability on the part of the mother that wastes it on the new boyfriend and nothing on the children. This is turning our country into a 3rd world African nation!

    check out: http://crispe.org/blog and search “Serfdom”

  9. Cuban Cigars and Escargot! Now, that’s what I call modern survival!

    Money Saving Tip: I read that restaurants reuse the shells and run them through the dishwasher.

    How does one go about raising snails for food? That might be a good side business, especially for local markets and restaurants. I think most snails come from Thailand now, instead of Burgundy.

  10. Jack this show was awesome!! Dan’s story and the way you told it was very moving and inspiring. On top of that you showed your compassion for your fellow man as well as your passion to save this country.

    I can’t wait to see how big of an impact TSP will be on our recovery. I’m sharing your/our message every chance I get. I’m directing people to the podcast everyday in the hope that they will wake up.

    I don’t know where I would be without your show. I’m definitely in much better shape than I was a little over 2 yrs ago when I first started listening to TSP.

    THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR WHAT YOU ARE DOING!
    Jarrett

  11. Way to go Dan, and Jack. Dan, if you read this, it gets better…it really does. Crowds still weird me out, but it gets better. In many ways I envy you, I am putting some of that time in the garden on hold, to finish out my career, but those things which you encouraged us all in are becoming more important every day. Thanks for reminding me…

  12. Greg Harvey

    Jack read my savings tip on salvage grocery stores. I’ve heard of lots of people who throw out food the day after the ‘expiration’ date or if they left the hamburger out on the counter for an hour. Shame on them for being so wasteful. I don’t buy things with popped seals and I’ve learned to be careful about older tortilla chips because they go rancid easily. I’ve had a few dented cans start leaking so they won’t store like undented ones so use them first. The store often gets in ‘feed’ bread from the store that is pulled from the shelves but isn’t too old to use. They sell it for 3 for $1, so I can sometimes get $5 worth of 7-grain bread for $1. No coupon clipping necessary for these savings.

  13. Great show Jack. Keep on doing what your doing. Dan’s story was especailly moving. It is great to hear a positive outcome in these tough times. Dan’s children will undoubtedly grow into strong and independet adults. They have their father to thank and be proud of. Thanks for you service, both of you.

  14. As always a great show. I have to comment on Dan’s story. It was exactly the inspiration I needed. I am also a vet and going through a divorce. It is good to know that the light at the end of the tunnel is not an oncoming train. Thank you Dan & Jack for the tools to get through my personal disaster.