Episode-656- Storm Prepping and Aftermath Survival

I often say on the show we don’t “prep for events” we instead prepare to deal with out systems of support.  Yet at times we do need to analyze specific threats to our survival and formulate more specific plans based on our individual risk, specifically our geographic risks.

Note – The photo above was taken on my iPhone of a Church Hall damaged by a recent tornado in an area about 5 miles from our office in Hot Springs Village Arkansas.  Neither our home or our office suffered any damage.  More photos of this area will be posted later this week.

You can see the full sized image by clicking on the picture, notice the picture still hanging on the back wall!

Join me today as we discuss…

  • The two primary effects of storm damage active damage and aftermath
  • Wind gets all the press but water does more killing
  • Most people die in vehicles (storm related deaths)
  • Some basic preps everyone needs
    • A designated shelter area (not always easy)
    • A black out kit (2 is 1 and 1 is none)
    • A weather alert radio (and other alerts)
    • An antenna for the TV (I will explain this)
    • An evac plan
    • A get home plan
    • An awareness plan
    • A generator and gas
  • Assessing the major storm types
    • Severe thunderstorms
    • Tornadic storms
    • Tropical Storms
    • Hurricanes
    • Blizzards
    • Ice Storms
  • Thoughts on prep redundancy
    • Flooded, burned, etc gear is useless
    • Underground structures
    • Above ground structures
    • Community redundancy

Additional Resources for Today’s Show

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15 Responses to Episode-656- Storm Prepping and Aftermath Survival

  1. Weather alert radio (if they could get reception) would have saved lives in Albert Pike last summer’s flash flood. No warning.

  2. Jack talking about blizzards this time of year isn’t completely off base. We had a blizzard up here in North Dakota over the past weekend that knocked out electricity bo almost a quarter of the state. Amazing how unprepared people are. It was 2 – 3 days for most and you would have thought some were starving.

  3. I’m in a South Florida first floor 1-BR apt and this is my plan: Harness and leash on the dog with the leash tied around my waist. We go into the bathtub, me covering him and the couch cushions over us. I haven’t figured out how to tie us directly to the bathtub fixture yet but still working on that one. I have several emergency bags that are in various areas (one in a large heavy trunk, the others in the bedroom closet – hoping to grab one and toss it into the bathroom with us). The apt buildings here are built to withstand hurricanes so I’m hoping that will work out in my favor.

  4. Hunkerdown

    Haven’t listened to the show yet (will soon), but have taken some time like you to assess my preps in light of the recent storms. I live in Chattanooga, TN with many neighboring communities wiped out. I’ve taken notes on what was missing at the local stores first, the stories of people not prepared at all, the lines at the gas pumps and working resturants and overall the impact on people without electricity and water. I have found a few holes in my preps that are being immediately shored up. I highly encourage people to do the same and fill in the gaps asap. I’ve been listening and prepping almost since the beginning of your show and since I had no major home damage, it has been easy to make it through with no power and other basics. I have also been able to focus on helping others and not had to worry about myself which is a good feeling knowing you are good to go.
    Many folks used to make fun of my preps and carrying around a BOB and now they are asking me what all I have in there. It is definitely time to start spreading the word as more people are understanding the importance of prepping. Keep up the good work.

  5. I’ve got to second the Sylvannia LED Night-lights that Jack Reviewed. I have 4 of them now, and am pretty happy with them.

  6. One weather alert I love is an app called Weather Alert USA for iPhone.

    Have it on my iPhone and iPad.
    It acts just like my WX radio right down to the alert sounds.
    Also lets me select SAME alerts for neighboring counties where I know weather “comes from”.

    It’s awesome to have if I’m working away from the house, at the store, etc.
    Both went off a half dozen times while at a customer location last week.

  7. David McNair

    I have had good luck with the “Energizer-Weather Ready” flashlights. I keep a pair by the bed and more in the great room for blackouts. I also use them daily because I get dressed in the morning at 0400 and I need a light to find things.

  8. God bless you jack, the hand of Jesus diverted the storm from your property. I’m taking R&R, hot showers, and sleep indoors for a few days before I do it again. This time near water. East of La Pine, Oregon is nothing but pine desert and no water.

    http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/frewin/recreation/winema/maps/campingmap.gif

  9. If your already carrying a smartphone the email weather alerts from http://www.accuweather.com/ can really save your butt with some real time situational awareness.

    I sign up for the emergency alerts and local weather forecasts for my area… An absolute must if your living on a mountain with your own micro-climate.

  10. Dan Hunter

    No matter how strong mankind becomes mother nature will always show us who is boss.

  11. Just wanted to send my well wishes and thoughts to all those affected by the storms and tornadoes.

    Also a reminder that, in my opinion, being a prepper (or a human being for that matter) comes with a responsibility to help those in need. Ain’t no better way to make a convert!

  12. dakotaslim

    Going into a basement is better, but you should build a protective area in the basement in case something big like a fuel tank gets rolled or dropped into the basement crushing everyone. That happened here in SD a few years back.

  13. watchdover

    Another great show, very informative.
    I always take notes and try to incorporate the things that apply to me and where I live.
    Thanks againg for alot of great ideas.

  14. Jack,

    One thing about TV Reception. Most stations to get over the air need more than an antenna, Also add an analog to digital signal converter. These are about $60.00 per unit.

    Use a Good Radio, the weather alert radio tip and the alternate kits and locations is a Great tip.

    Keep up the good work. Additionally ponder other communication plans like an out of state contact for any and all family members, and check for plans at work or schools at well.

  15. Jack, I was 5 years old in Miami when Andrew hit. It turned out to be more like an extended camping trip for me, being 5 and unaware of the danger my family had just been delivered from, but two things stuck in my mind:

    One, my running outside to get our front door after the storm broke it in half. He was saved from debris by a low concrete wall in front of our house. I’ll never forget that.

    Two, the tar shingles from our roof that were stuck like tomahawks in our shaving brush tree. That alone convinced me that you either need to be inside in a strong place or get out of dodge when storms like that come.