Episode-354- Four Rules of Storing Food

Today we are going to discuss storing food for both acute and long term survival needs.  I find with people new to preparedness it is one of the things they are interested in but often fail to take action on.  There is one fundamental though, food is necessary for life, without it you are in real trouble.

Join me today as we discuss…

  • The lack of vision many “disaster documentaries” have about food shortages
  • What the real threat of pandemic teaches us about the need to store food
  • Why you should start with the rule, store what you eat
  • Utilizing the “opportunity buy”
  • The role long term commercial storables play in your storage plan
  • The value of cheap storables like wheat, barley, rice and their limitation
  • The importance of protection from rodents
  • The myth that a “garden makes you a target” any more then existing makes you a target
  • Why you must become a producer
  • The three levels of production and how they work together
  • The holistic nature of a true long term food program

Resources for today’s show…

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7 Responses to Episode-354- Four Rules of Storing Food

  1. Check out Dave\’s Garden at davesgarden.com

    This is a GREAT forum for various types of planting/gardening.

    I use a vinyl gutter nailed to the top rail of my fence – plant lettuce in, will be trying strawberries this year.

    I use stackable planters (5) and grow 70 bush bean plants in about 1 square foot.

    I use 5-gallon buckets to plant tomatoes in and am able to move as the sun changes. Have done the same thing with squash.

    I use garbage cans to collect rain water off my gutters and use for gardening.

  2. I know. at least in North Dakota and Minnisota, there are many good two year schools that cost a lot less than the 4 year schools. The ones here offer several different agracultural AS degrees.

  3. In “Episode-354- Four Rules of Storing Food” you mentioned about shutting off the electrical power for a couple of hours. Many moons ago, when we were still newlyweds, the ‘better half’ and I would spend at least one evening a week in “NO POWER MODE”. Aka: No Power Nights

    Quite simply:
    – No electric lights.
    – No microwave or electric range/oven. (We cooked on gas anyway.)
    – No TV
    – Radio only if wind-up or battery powered.
    – No telephone.
    – Nothing using standard household electric power.

    The exception to this was the household (110 vac) water pump when we flushed the toilet. Not practical for a short duration exercise like this…

    The reason for this was being newlyweds, we were basically penniless, and this was a great cost-saving exercise. We read, played board games/cards, etc. We had a blast!

    The blizzard ’93 proved how valuable this weekly lesson was.

    We were living in NE Alabama at the time and received a 4-foot ‘gift’ of snow, and no power/water for 3 weeks. It was like camping with the following exceptions: #1- The “tent” was whole lot more comfortable and warmer, #2- the chow was a whole lot better!

    Ok, fast-forward 20+ years. Yes, we are doing a whole lot better financially. But the exercise and experience is just as important for other reasons.

    Ever notice just many otherwise “normal” people totally freak-out if the electric goes off?

    How do your kids or grandkids react when the normal conveniences of modern life (IE: electric and running water), suddenly go off-line?

    Nowadays, the list for a NO POWER NIGHT would also include:

    – No computer.
    – No MP3 player.
    – No video games.

    Now that I have rambled-on for a few minutes of your time, the above occurred to me tonight while sitting around a fire outside. Simple pleasures. A fire, good company, hot beverage, great conversation. NO ELECTRIC REQUIRED! But also a great exercise for people who wish to camp, or prepare for living without our ‘modern conveniences’. Food for thought…

    Mark

  4. Another thing to add to Jack’s show. When we eat from a garden it is more likely that we’ll be eating more fresh and raw fruits and vegetables (AKA live foods) which is extremely important for a healthy lifestyle (how many sick people do we know that all they need to do is improve their diet). This is very important for prepping for disasters. Especially if there is some pandemic it could help you survive the sickness if you happen to get it. I think Jack has mentioned health in other podcasts but I can’t remember and it is insinuated in the show but not explicitly stated. This follows with the mantra of helping to prep for the future and living a better life now.

    Jon

  5. Another thing about eating out of your garden is that you are removing some dollars from the system that brings all the toxic junk food in from the four corners of the world. Every dollar I eat from my garden is one less dollar that goes to companies I do not wish to support.

    Regarding eat what you store, I do get and practice that. I don’t see it as one or the other though. I bought four five gallon buckets, mylar bags and O2 absorbers for a song. I filled one with rice, one with flour, one with sugar and one with mixed salt, baking powder, baking soda and some drink mix. I stashed them under then workbench and sleep well knowing I can at least survive an extended period of time and don’t need to worry about rotation or expiration for 30 years give or take.

    The rest is gravy.

  6. Hey Jack, all I got to say is WOW! what a great and inspiring podcast. You are truely a gifted orator and you should continue to use your talent to inspire and mobilize people towards great causes as you are. long term you should consider going into politics, and bring an insightful and uncorruped point of view which is sorely lacking in our public officials.

    Regards.