Episode-829- Listener Calls for 1-27-12

So it is Friday and we have some calls today on some great stuff.  Today we hear about attracting bees, overlooked chemical threats, dealing with mean dogs, national reciprocity, alternatives to concealed carry and more.

Remember to be on a show like this one just pick up your phone and call 866-65-THINK.  The best way to improve your chances of being on the air is ask your question or make your point up front, then provide details.  Also call from a quite area with a good connection and speak up so you can be well heard.  I can’t put all calls on the air but I do my best to get most of them on.

Join me Today as I Cover Your Questions On…

  • What is real poverty really like, most of us don’t know
  • What are some concealed carry alternatives
  • What’s up with the USDA, National Agricultural Classification Survey
  • Want bees plant radishes and let them go to flower
  • Keeping bees around year round
  • Is a gas mask a good idea even for something we might call “minor”
  • A lesson given by two escaped cows
  • Doritos for making friends with dogs
  • Wood chips, nitrogen, fungus, hugelkultur and more
  • Dealing with debt contingencies in the event of a spouses death
  • Thoughts on the national reciprocity law for concealed carry

Resources for Today’s Show…

Remember to comment, chime in and tell us your thoughts, this podcast is one man’s opinion, not a lecture or sermon. Also please enter our listener appreciation contest and help spread the word about our show. Also remember you can call in your questions and comments to 866-65-THINK and you might hear yourself on the air

37 Responses to Episode-829- Listener Calls for 1-27-12

  1. Wife just sent me this article…

    Really fascinating, on how to keep foods without refrigeration.

  2. Hey Jack, another great shoe. Another item to carry that I’ve been looking to get is somthing called the “SAP CAP” It’s basically a black baseball cap with a sturdy bill and 16 ounces of material sewn into the back of the cap that has a “density equal to lead” Was wondering if anyone has seen this or even has one. Unfortunately it cannot be shipped to certain states .

    • Hippiesteader

      That sap cap sounds like a lot of fun. I used to wear sap gloves when I had to go into town and they were a party! The only thing better than the sound of 16 oz of lead popping into a bad guys gut or jaw was the resounding “thud” of them hitting the ground :)

      Enjoy your new hat!

  3. Shannon Moore

    Jack,
    Thank you. That kinda stuff gets to me too.
    -Shannon

  4. Another option for an impromptu gas mask for OC, CS and more is to cover your face, particularly your mouth and nose, with a damp cloth. The chemical react to the moisture in our nose and mouth and a damp cloth will help to create a barrier. Obviously this doesn’t help with the eyes, but if you are looking to mitigate the effects at least temporarily so you can egress, etc., then having a large enough cloth that can cover your eyes too and/or allow you to continually wipe your eyes is a good idea. I have used this before and it has helped me. For me, OC, or pepper spray, doesn’t bother my eyes as much as it does my nose, mouth and even my breathing. Once again, for me and me only, OC/pepper spray hurts my lungs more than my eyes, plus I end up with mucus free-flowing from my nose down the back of my throat. This may be why the damp towel over my mouth and nose works me.

    I recently had to pepper spray a mentally ill person during the line of duty who was armed with a stick. We were in an enclosed room. Once the spray took effect, I had to go into the room and get him. I was coughing and hacking so bad that we had to get him out of the room before I could cuff him. The spray worked.

    On a side note, I love Sabre Red pepper spray and it has CS gas in it as well. I have purchased this spray for my wife and daughters as I can vouch for its effectiveness as it is one of only two sprays that I have found so far that consistently work on me .

    • I’m told campden tablets used in home wine making can neutralize the effects of OC.

      See:
      http://www.eco-action.org/dod/no7/cs_gas.html

      No idea of the exact ratio to dissolve in water, or how exactly to apply. I imagine you’d keep a solution in a spray bottle and simply spray your face.

      • Campden tablets can neutralize “agent CS” gas, which is NOT the same thing as “agent OC” / pepper spray, but when you mix up a Campden tablets solution you are making dilute sulfuric acid. This is not something you want to spray in someones face, eye damage could result. Only water clean enough to drink should be used for decontaminating the head area.

  5. Regarding feeding dogs to make them your buddy: I used to watch a show called To Catch a Thief (or something along those lines) where guys would break into folks’ houses to prove their vulnerabilities and then give their homes a security upgrade. One of the things that the main burglar would ALWAYS do when confronted with large, barking dogs is open the fridge and start tossing them food. Then sometimes he’d put ‘em outside or just let ‘em be while they feasted on people food. The homeowners were always shocked because they were utterly convinced that their dogs would protect their property.

  6. 2012 National Agricultural Classification survey States right on the front page “Please respond by February 3,2012 Response is required by law.If you do not reply, you may be personally visited or you may receive a telephone call.” Glad you brought this up mine got stuffed under papers on the desk and forgot about. Guess I’ll be getting on this

  7. I didn’t see any of those comments, did you delete them Jack?

    • Modern Survival

      @Jake first keep in mind it was on facebook when I first posted the story and the answer to your question is yes. I was not about to be associated with such BS.

  8. The talk about wood mulch always makes me wonder (because I couldn’t be more of a gardening newbie) — at what part of the growing process do you mulch? I’m assuming you wait ’til after the plants have germinated, right? (Sorry if that seems like a dumb question, but the only dumb question is one that nobody asks, right?)

    • Modern Survival

      @Sarah, you always mulch you just pull it back enough to allow new seedlings to come up and once they do back fill around them.

  9. As a hobby beekeeper let acknowledge how important your contribution is to overall bee health. Simply by pointing out that the dandelion is the first flower available every spring, and the bee biology has adapted to that flower. The dandelion only blooms for two weeks and provides the best spring food for the bees. Please pass along the work of Tom Theobold regarding treated seeds and the ruse of Colony Collapse Disorder:

    http://www.bouldercountybeekeepers.org/toms-corner/

    even Dan Rather got the message:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dan-rather/honeybees-pesticides-food-chain-_b_975934.html?ir=Yahoo

    please inspect your stored seeds and discard any that have been treated with clothiniadian.

    • Lidia Seebeck

      The caller was from Colorado. I’ll entirely agree with him that snapdragon and lavender are two good– and drought-tolerant– options for attracting bees. I plan on doing both myself this year. Marigold is another common flower to use. Salvias are also excellent, as are Artemisias (sagebrush, also mugwort and wormwood, southernwood, etc). Many cover crops are excellent magnets if allowed to bloom. One other I would be quick to add is Rabbitbrush (en Espanol: chamisa) (Chrysothamnus spp.), a native that requires no extra moisture and does a great job of attracting not only bees, but both Monarch and Viceroy butterflies. Do not plant Rabbitbrush in areas above 20 inches per year moisture, but a great option for dry regions. Another native that can be used from Fountain, Colorado and south is Cane Cholla (Cylindropuntia imbricata).

      When I lived in California, my go-to bee magnets were my citrus trees, my lavenders, and my rosemary. In the South, rosemary is an awesome bee magnet in season. Bottlebrush trees are also good, and they help cover the summer season when many others do not bloom.

      As for radishes, another option is to use Rat-Tail Radish. This is a variety bred not for the root but for the seedpod. Obviously, this means you allow it to bolt and bloom, thus benefiting the bees (yes they love it, but watch out as wasps do too). Then you eat the unripe seedpod, which is not as stringy as, say, using a standard globe radish in the seedpod stage. Rat-tails are crisp and tender. It can be hard to find the seeds, but it is worth it. An additional benefit– succession plant through the summer so that you have them for salads all summer long when your root radishes are gone.

  10. Jim Montgomery

    Jack- My thoughts exactly on a national reciprocity law….

  11. Wanted to add to the call about using radishes to attract pollenators. Radishes have one more use. If you let them go to to flower they can still be used as part of your food supply. The leaves are great in stir fry, soups and as greens. I grew radishes last year, and like Jack I don’t really care for them, but their greens were good even during the heat of summer. I didn’t try them raw, but they were great steamed, stirfried or added to just about anything you might use mustard or turnip greens in.

    • Modern Survival

      @Candy will have to try that myself this year. I have done it with daikon but never regular radishes.

  12. The chemical weapon you were trying to think of is VX.

  13. incendiary_dan

    If I recall correctly, the Egyptian protesters at Tahrir came up with some pretty neat improvised gas mask plans that have been distributed. I think Anonymous and/or some of the Occupy groups have posted them publicly, if you want to Google it. I particularly like the one based around a 2L soda bottle.

    • From the Anonymous Survival Guide For Citizens in a Revolution:

      Tear gas
      • Check the wind and move against the wind.
      • Spread information about where to go amongst
      the protestors on the streets.
      • Never go out without masks – even the paper
      masks handed out at doctor’s offices or masks
      used to cover nose and mouth when gardening
      will provide some protection.
      • Wear synthetic fibers at best (Ex. Nylon, Acrylic,
      Polyester). Tear gas will not stay on clothing
      made of these.
      • Fabric doused with vinegar will help neutralize
      tear gas.
      • If you have some, take physiological serum
      (saline solution – contact solution, available at
      most pharmacies) with you (rinse eyes with it, it
      will wash them without burning). If you cannot
      find any saline solution, flush your eyes VERY
      WELL with clean cold water. Thoroughly rinse
      off any areas of exposed skin as well.
      • Diving masks hold off a lot.

  14. Jack, I understand your frustration with those people who said things like those people should be hung when they abandoned their children.
    They are fools to believe that those parents did that to save themselves. They did it to save their children from a fate they could not endure themselves.
    I wonder how many of these poor people forced to abandon their children have commited suicide because of their situation?
    Go ahead and hang their corpse!
    Go ahead and burn their dead bodies but it will be upon a funeral pyre and tears will be in your eyes as you truly see their situation and where their decision has lead them!

  15. Fail on my part for not mentioning hugelkultur. My call sounded terrible. I have come to the conclusion that if I do try hugelkultur I will go find some fallen branches out in the forest.

    • In Ohio we have a “safe place” law that lets parents drop off their kids at fire stations or police stations and not face any criminal charges. I know many other states have that same law. The idea was to give parents who are desperate (starving, addicted, fearing for the life of the kid) a safe place they can place the kid with no questions asked. The reason for this kind of law was the number of kids who were being dumped into dumpsters or left in boxes in alleys.

      That is in the US. We don’t hear about things like kids left to die in an alley these days. And you won’t hear much about kids being dropped off at fire stations either. About six months ago we had that happen at our station. A young (20ish) girl walked up and asked if this was one of the safe places. She had not bathed in days, looked hungry and strung out. She said she feared that her boy would die if she did not give him up right away. The baby was about a month old, ok cared for, but in dirty cloths also. She gave the LT a bag of “all his stuff” and walked off crying.

      We heard from the police that the girl they think she was died about two months later of exposer after a two day rain storm.

      It happens here people. And it rips your heart out. EMS sees some messed up stuff and it is not getting better.

  16. Hard Core Poverty! -Dump Dwellers-

    Your tax dollars have funded my dozens of trips around the world to some of the nicest places. Also, to some places where abject poverty is sooo overwhelming it is breathtaking. No food for the naked kids, bugs living in folks that couldn’t do anything bout it, the typical ugly stuff. Shanty towns; bah! Seen ‘em in every continent and except for the lone hovels in the deserts of the Mid East, they leave little impression in my mind of poverty (nothing growing, no water anywhere- how do they make that work?). But what truly sticks in my head were the dump dwellers. Not the folks fortunate enough to have a shack built out of dump scraps, living like kings, but the guys who had nothing and lived in a small hole they burrowed into a refuse pile. Living on discarded food scraps and looking forward to the day they find an intact plastic bag, a plastic bottle with a cap, bucket without a hole in the bottom or maybe, just wishing on a star maybe, a knife. Then they will have something better in their lives.

  17. Great comment in this episode about focusing on being self-reliant rather than going to protest in the street. When stuff is this messed up, protesting is a waste of time. Best to take care of you and yours.

  18. Jack: Great show. Another important alternate concealed carry item – a multi-use MUST – is a VERY bright flashlight. Even cops use bright lights to disable folks at night, and an extremely bright light will cause night blindness, albeit temporarily – to allow you time to get away. A camera flash works very well and we all have the experience of having a flash go off in our face and “blinding us”. Flashlights are very useful for other purposes as well. I recommend one which will be carried on a key chain, and uses standard batteries, AA or AAA, which are cheaper and easier to find in periods of limited resources. FENIX has several models, LD20 is excellent, or or you can go with a Surefire (Surefire 6P LED Defender Single Output LED Flashlight – expensive), or Streamlight ProTac 2L Professional Tactical, but they use the more expensive batteries. Many models out there. You can/should also buy models which can substitute for the kubaton, being less obvious. Watch the “Fight Science” episode on self defense. Stay safe all. . .

  19. regarding ‘chemical masks’..

    this is something I’ve added to my smaller kits for particulate, chem spray and viral contamination situations (airborne)

    http://readimask.com/

    a very portable solution for getting through smoke and dust while maintaining vision as well.

  20. I want to propose something; as jack has pointed out the military personel are pretty much taken care of first (as far as supplies). So what I propose is that for those of us who send “care packages” to the troops with things that we think they may like or be able to use, is it possable to send a care package to a family in Greece instead? As a father the stories coming out of there rip out my heart everytime I hear them and I want to help

    • Nate, I can somewhat understand your thought process as I am a father myself and I hate to see any child suffer. But to compare care packages for the troops fighting for our freedom with the problems in Greece is a real stretch.

      There are probably many different ways to donate to the people in Greece if that is what you choose to do. I bet that the Christian group World Vision has a way to do so. If you would prefer a more secular option, then Doctors without Borders or similar agency probably has options for you to do so.

      Even though I know that the government provides all of the necessities for our troops, I know that there are quality-of-life things that they would enjoy. Our troops are serving in some very inhospitable conditions right now, especially in Afghanistan. Their voluntary service takes them away from their families for months at a time. If a deck of cards, Starbucks coffee and a Snickers bar makes them happy, then that is the least I can do for their sacrifice and service.

      Just my opinion.

  21. Hey Jack, I’m glad you talked about gas masks. With all the “occupy” ass-clowns protesting the police are using teargas to disburse them, and over-spray is becoming a real issue. I never thought much about gas masks until I start seeing on the local news almost every night a new protest for whatever reason, and the response from law enforcement. Does anyone in the TSP community have a favorite mask they like and why? Great show.

  22. Damn good comments at the end of this episode Jack, very inspiring. I went back and listened to the last 5 minutes or so again. Great message about why we do what we do.

  23. Ready made resources has a product called The Breath of Life. They say it gives you 15-20 min. and protects from cs, pepper and even mustard?!? Only $39.95

  24. Jack,
    I just got around to listening to this podcast today. You said some things that needed to be said about poverty. Americans are in fact clueless about how much of the world lives. I would add that it doesn’t help when we bomb them, but hey, that’s just me. I’m glad you said what you said, because there are some harsh realities that we all need to wrap our heads around so that we can survive the hard times and be more understanding if the hard times never come. Take care,

    Charlie

  25. Thoughts on HR 822. In many ways they are already imposing rules on states. So I am not sure the precedent isn’t there already.

    I know a lot have issue with it in regards to state rights. But I am of the opinion it’s about individual rights. I want the states to stand up against the Federal government when they breach my rights, and the Federal government to stand against the states when a state is in violation.

    You are right the HR 822 is unlikely to actually become law. But what I think is really important about HR 822 is that it shows how far we have come since 1994. That there is a growing change and increasing support for our 2nd Amendment rights.