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Episode-2371- Listener Calls for 1-31-19 — 13 Comments

  1. I spent part of the time growing up outside of Wasilla, and one of the neighbors out there was a musher with close to 30 sled dogs. As a kid I remember him feeding all the dogs chunks of salmon with a little bit of kibble. It seemed to me at the time he wasn’t giving them very much to eat, but now I would have to imagine the nutritional density of the protein-rich fish meant a little bit went a long way. My own family didn’t fish enough to have large amounts of lower-quality salmon, but our basset hound certainly did love the scraps of salmon when we had it for dinner.

    Just a side note, my mom and stepdad now typically feed their dog chicken (boiled and deboned) they buy in 10lb bags of chicken leg quarters when one of the local stores has clearance sales. They say the good-quality dog kibble is only slightly cheaper, so they’ve been doing this the past couple years and the dog seems happy enough. Food for thought (pun intended)

  2. Regarding raw fish safety in general, for humans or dogs. Here’s one raw fish junkie’s 2 cents…

    Saltwater:  There is a long-standing naughty/nice list for saltwater fish with regard to species known to require parasite remediation though freezing or cooking vs those generally considered safe.  In the vast majority of cases your local sushi shop will use frozen fish, even for species considered safe without freezing.  Higher-end shops will selectively use truly fresh, never-frozen, fish and this is typically reflected in higher prices.

    Freshwater:  As Jack mentioned, freshwater fish is not safe to eat raw.  Freezing does not kill freshwater parasites, so cooking is mandatory.  Your chances of getting sick are pretty low, especially if the fish looks healthy, but it’s best not to take chances.

    Freshwater spawned or brackish water:  Treat these the same as freshwater fish, cook it to be safe, and yes that includes salmon unless it is farmed.  Salmon sushi is a recent and pretty much western invention, salmon (wild salmon) was not eaten raw in Japan.  I was born in Okinawa, lived there for years at a time as a Navy brat, and never saw salmon sushi/sashimi until sometime in the 80’s here in the States.  Since the 80’s/90’s though it is everywhere, including Japan.  Farmed salmon is spawned and farmed under controlled conditions so not prone to the same parasites as wild salmon and safe to consume raw.  It is still sucky farmed garbage, but you can eat it raw, and so can your dog.

     

  3. Just to throw this out there. I watched Geoff Lawton’s Urban Permaculture on Prime Video.

    Is this the same video being referenced in the episode.

    Just double checked, it is still there and is phenomenal.

  4. Regarding new home, “buy once – cry once,” purchases…

    Highly, highly recommend Speed Queen washer and dryer.  Hope you can find a dealer in your area. Nuff said!

    Also, love the idea of a new home/essentials type show.  Run with that!

     

    • Don’t know what you’re talking about specifically yet (about to listen to the episode now), but I have Amana and never once looked at those fancy Samsung/smart major appliances. If my washer/dryer breaks down, being analog, I can fix’em myself!

    • I’ve been told by an appliance store owner that speed queen is the only washer build that still uses stainless steel gears. We love ours

       

  5. The beauty about being a polymath is that everything tends to follow similar structures. In other words, if you learn a few concepts and systems really well, then many others follow some similar structure, or, have various aspects that are greatly similar. For example transportation infrastructure, cardiovascular system, and computer networks follow similar patterns (largely known as Network Science). 

    Eventually, especially if you enjoy and seek out knowledge for personal development and growth, you will eventually be good, if not great, at many things because these patterns will unfold before you given what you already understand. You will intuitively know what questions to ask, and what basic things to do in each field/project.

    It’s wonderful thing to be able to do a lot of things for yourself instead of paying for everything traditional-modernly.

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