Episode-202- 9 Underrated Permaculture Options

Today we take a look at several underrated permaculture options several from around the world and many from right here in the U.S.   Each of these can be grown in most if not all of the U.S. and is highly disease and pest resistant.

Tune in today to hear about the following plants/shrubs/trees and how they can fit into your landscape and survival planning

  • Editable Dogwoods (Cornelian Cherry)
  • Flower Quince
  • European and Russian Strains of Mountain Ash
  • The Paw Paw (how to get fruit in 2-4 years)
  • The Aronia (productive US native mostly unknown)
  • Honey Berry
  • Goumi
  • Sea Berry (or Sea Buckthorn)
  • Mini Dwarf Apple Trees

Resources for Today’s Show

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7 Responses to Episode-202- 9 Underrated Permaculture Options

  1. Jack,

    Thank you for introducing me to other permaculture options that are uncommon and underrated. As my family will be relocating across the country, we’re not going to implement them in anyway in the current house; but will look at adding some to the new homestead.

  2. Good show Jack! Now I wish I had more land..

  3. We could not Identify the male of the sea buckthorn , the nursery ships before they can ID.
    How do we tell the difference ,or do we just keep buying until we “get lucky”.

  4. Love this show and all the other permaculture and gardening shows! Thank you for putting all the time and effort into researching and preparing these shows for us out here…

    I particularly like making jams, jellies, etc. and am so happy to hear about other fruit-bearing shrubs we can grow here and grow more of our own fruit for these purposes! We are planning to send some of these plants to our gardening parents as gifts for the future.

    Thanks!

  5. Cool show. I’d add elderberries and serviceberries/saskatoons to the list of tasty (elderberry wine!) and somewhat exotic berry bushes you can grow in a variety of climates. Less exotic raspberries and blackberries are musts too (you can even get thornless varieties), and if you can grow blueberries in your climate, they put out a lot of berries and live for 60 years.

    A note on sea buckthorn: it’s invasive so I’d recommend folks take the same sort of containment measures as they would planting bamboo. The shoots can come up in the yard (not even close to the bushes) and they suck mightily to step on barefoot. Also they’re thorny, so kind of a pain to pick.

  6. Postscript: I tried to order a couple of things and was told by the very nice lady at Raintree that because it is so late in the year they will not guarantee plants shipped to the south right now (I was trying to ship to the Albuquerque mountain area). However, if you order them now (she said) for the proper time to plant, you will be first in line for next spring and they won’t charge the credit card until they ship.

    This would be a great show to revisit in the fall timeframe as a reminder for folks.

    Thanks again!

  7. This memorial weekend I bought an aronia bush for the cabin . Fortunetly the clerk at the nursary was a degreed horticulturalist that knew her latin otherwise she would not have known its common name of Black Chokeberry. After getting it home I discovered I had one at the house !